Category: Tanya Saracho

Review: Fade (Teatro Vista and Victory Gardens Theater)

Sari Sanchez stars as Lucia in Fade by Tanya Saracho, Teatro Vista            

         

Fade

Written by Tanya Saracho  
VG Biograph Theater, 2433 N. Lincoln (map)
thru Dec 23  |  tix: $15-$56  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

November 29, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: First Look 2014 – “Hushabye” “Ironbound” “Okay, Bye” (Steppenwolf Theatre)

Billy Fenderson and Lusia Strus star in "Ironbound" by Martyna Majok, directed by Daniella Topol, part of Steppenwolf Theatre's "First Look Repertory 2014". (photo credit: Emily Schwartz)        
      
First Look 2014

Written by Tanya Saracho, Martyna Majok,
    and Joshua Conkel
Directed by Yasen Peyankov, Daniella Topol,
     and Margot Bordelon
at Steppenwolf Garage, 1624 N. Halsted (map)
thru Aug 24  |  tickets: $20   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review 
     

August 15, 2014 | 0 Comments More

About Face announces 2010-2011 Season, future plans

Artistic Director Bonnie Metzgar Announces 15th Season

 

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Including Three World Premieres, New Artistic Associates, and XYZ Festival

Celebrating the 15th anniversary of About Face Theatre, it looks like Artistic Director Bonnie Metzgar and new Executive Director Jason Held have upped the ante for the start of their next 15 years.  Included in the upcoming season is Float by Patricia Kane, Pony by Sally Oswald and The Homosexuals by Phillip Dawkins, are their second annual XYZ Festival of New Works

 

 

 

 

About Face is excited to roll out our 15th anniversary with a season that examines individuals at the precipice of change,” says Bonnie Metzgar. “As our organization and society at large both make pivotal choices, this season looks at the risks and exhilarating possibilities available to us in periods of transformation.

 

October 2010

XYZ Festival

The XYZ Festival will introduce Chicago audiences to the most innovative LGBTQA artists and artworks at all stages of development. Presented over the month of October, projects will include a workshop production of TINY ROOMS by Carson Kreitzer, and new works from AFT About Face Artistic Associates Tanya Saracho and Patrick Andrews, as well as a performance lounge series featuring AFT Artistic Associate Dan Stermer’s performance art/dance trio Double DJ, curated by AFT Marketing Director Jane Beachy. From the hundreds of scripts received for the XYZ Readings Series, four new plays by acclaimed emerging playwrights round out the festival.

XYZ Logo

November 11 – December 12

Float

FLOAT, a new play written by About Face Theatre (AFT) Artistic Associate Patricia Kane and directed by 500 Clown founder Leslie Danzig with dramaturgy by Jessica Thebus. The all-female cast includes Wendy Robie, Adrianne Cury, Peggy Roeder, Rengin Altay and AFT Artistic Associate Amy Matheny. FLOAT will run from November 11 – December 12 at Theater Wit (1229 West Belmont).

 

April-May 2011 

Pony

 

In April/May, About Face Theatre will present the world premiere of PONY by Sally Oswald, a play inspired by Georg Büchner, at the Chopin Theatre. Directed by Bonnie Metzgar, PONY will be featured as part of The Woyzeck Project, a city-wide festival hosted by About Face Theatre, The Hypocrites, and Collaboraction in which artists around the city will produce hybrid works inspired by the classic anti-war play. Set near the location of the famous murder scene in Woyzeck, PONY is a tale of shifting gender roles and the dangers of obsessive love.

 

June/July 2011

The Homosexuals

About Face Theatre will conclude its season in June/July with The Homosexuals by Chicago playwright Phillip Dawkins, starring Patrick Andrews at Victory Gardens Studio. The Homosexuals presents the interwoven lives, friendships, and relationships among six homosexual men over six years. Set at present time in a Midwestern city, Dawkins’ comedic and heartbreaking work examines the fears, doubts, and hope among the gay community in a 21st century perspective on the queer classic, The Boys in the Band.

About Face Theatre’s 15th Anniversary Season exemplifies how far the LGBTQ community has come from being defined by one issue to being seen as complex. In our 15 years, AFT has given voice to that changing dialogue around issues facing the queer community. As we move forward, we understand the need to bring the conversation around sexuality and gender to all people,” says Executive Director Jason Held.

 

 

 

August 11, 2010 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: Our Lady of the Underpass (16th Street Theater, with Teatro Vista)

A compelling story, no matter what you see

 

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16th Street Theater (with Teatro Vista) presents
 
Our Lady of the Underpass
 
Written by Tanya Saracho
Directed by Sandra Marquez

at 16th Street Theater, 6420 W. 16th Street, Berwyn
(map)
through May 1 (more info)

By Catey Sullivan

Roughly mid-way through Our Lady of the Underpass, a disgruntled jogger played by Chris Cantelmi goes off on the “retards”  fucking up  his Fullerton Avenue running route as they gather to pray at the titular image.

“These Catholics,” he snarls, adjusting his scrotum through his expensive running gear, “They’re like, ‘Look at my grilled cheese! It’s Jesus! Call a press conference!”

If there’s a more authentic archetype of urban assholery on stage this month, we’d be surprised. With a wad of chewing gum and the ugly air of entitlement peculiar to 20something boys with a full head of hair and a Gold’s Gym physique, Cantalemi captures in full the egoism and the cluelessness of  fellow that’s all too recognizable.

Juan Gabriel Ruiz (photo credit: Art Carillo) He’s but one in the vivid, vibrant parade of characters that people Tanya Saracho’s docudrama centering on the image Obdulia Delgado discovered on the Fullerton Avenue underpass five years ago this month. Directed by Sandra Marquez (who helmed the same cast in last year’s world-premiere of Our Ladyat Victory Gardens), this joint Teatro Vista16th Street production offers an alternately tragic, comic, and provocative examination of faith and skepticism in Chicago.

Saracho spent months, tape-recorder in hand, at the underpass many claimed was a sacred spot after an image of the Virgin Mary (or was it a salt stain?) appeared. As the candles, flowers and petitions accrued, she interviewed the pilgrims who flocked to visit the manifestation of the Virgin Mary -  as well as those who insisted it was a bad patch job.  Our Lady captures the depth and breadth of both the spiritual and the cynical in six, captivating monologues. The disparate (and often desperate) stories are so wholly compelling, it becomes easy to overlook Saracho’s formidable powers as a reporter. At the underpass, complete strangers unburdened  their darkest secrets to her – hopes, hurts and emotions that, in many cases, they had never uttered aloud. If the playwriting thing doesn’t work out for Saracho, she’s surely got a career as an investigative journalist.

In contrast to Cantelmi’s masterstroke as the quintessential tool, Our Lady presents Suzette Mayobre as a Huppie (an upwardly mobile Latina) inexplicably shuddering through a complete breakdown in pink monkey pajamas and Uggs. Her story of a fairy tale relationship (“It was like we were trapped in an ad for a cruise”) that suddenly, literally turns to shit is as hilarious as it is upsetting. If doesn’t matter if you can’t directly relate to the plight of a woman whose perfect boyfriend takes an unforeseen  scatological swerve. Anyone who has ever  been forced to deal with the unthinkable  – and gone a little crazy trying to do so – will recognize themselves in this  moving, tragically funny portrait.

Equally compelling is Gabriel Juan Ruiz as Tony, Elgin resident, aspiring deacon and self-appointed guardian of the Underpass.  Ruiz creates a marvelous trajectory from soft-spoken reason to feral, screaming misogyny  in the space of a single monologue. Women are god’s creatures, Tony rhapsodizes with the gentle, doe-eyed wonder of a lamb -  until (and here, Ruiz captures the distilled essence of bug-eyed mania) they turn into the “beast of the Revelation.”  With Tony’s parting words, Ruiz’ unleashes a neediness that’s downright scary: “I’ve been on television four times!” He yells, and in that frenzied distress, one gets the sense of a desperation that’s almost sociopathic.

underpass1 On the other end of the spectrum is Charin Alvarez, as La Tia, the aunt of a severely disabled boy who is the love of her life. Her story unfolds in the self-effacing tones of a woman who has always put herself a far distant second behind anyone else she might encounter, from immediate family to factory co-workers. Recalling a  transnational Monterrey-to-Chicago love story, the family reunion that upended her life and her abiding devotion to a child not apt to live past one more birthday, Alvarez speaks with a melodious, near-hypnotic tone that is both her artistic signature and the voice of a unique character. It’s a sad, lovely and powerful story.

The one piece in Our Lady that does not work quite so well this time around is the nurse’s tale, the narrative of a Polish-American RN whose bitter recollections of growing up the daughter of a cleaning lady have shaped her angry world outlook. Amanda Powell – the sole newcomer to the cast since it’s premiere last year – leans too hard on the trash-talking vitriol, giving the piece an unvarying rage that doesn’t allow for an emotional arc.

That, however, is largely a quibble –  our sense is that the nurse’s mono-rancor will settle into more varying depths as the run continues.

Between the monologues, Saracho places brief choruses of prayer to Our Lady of the Underpass, of The Botanica that Also Sells Phone Cards, of the Puerto Rican Day Parade, of Affordable Duplexes and all the other causes the Virgin takes on as Fullerton Avenue becomes a shrine. The scenes play out on Brian Sidney Bembridge’s startlingly accurate replication of the underpass and the image on it. Mike Tutaj’s projections of flickering candles, graffiti and shimmering auras instill the piece with both a sense of mysticism and the harsh urban reality of disfigured concrete. No matter what you see as you gaze on the Underpass, Saracho’s story of its power is compelling.

 
Rating: ★★★
 

     
April 3, 2010 | 0 Comments More

Review: Teatro Luna’s “Lunitic(a)s”

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Teatro Luna presents:

Lunitic(a)s

Directed & Developed by Tanya Saracho
thru December 20th (ticket info)

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

Teatro Luna (Chicago’s only all Latina theatre company that produces a full season)’s Lunitic(a)s is a montage of scenes, vignettes and songs, which explore woman’s “everyday insanity” using the conceit of Mayan lunar mythology. It’s a great concept paired with a sophisticated execution that does not dwell in the academic or the poetic but manages to keep both feet planted firmly in the real. The piece features some of the most honest performing I have seen in the city, with talented and vibrant young actresses who rarely if ever take a misstep. Although the show has structural problems, stemming from cramming most of the darker pieces into the last third of the show, the play still maintains a grace and dignity that does not verge on the pretentious.

currently_21 A collaborative, original performance piece about the everyday struggles of womanhood is a risky undertaking today, just as it was in 2007 when Teatro Luna first staged Lunitic(a)s. The concept of the show has an academic feel to it; it is so empowering to it’s actresses, so quietly reverential of their lives and performances, it could pass for the culmination of freshman year at a conservatory; but the execution—writing, acting and directing is strictly professional. These women take themselves and this project seriously, and it pays off. The end result is an honest, simple and refreshing piece of theatre that has the courage to be truthful, introspective and serious when so much theater strives to stay one step ahead of potential criticism.

The play is clearly collaboratively written, with each piece tailor made for the performer. These performances are so vulnerable that you feel like you could climb on stage and join in. These women take the stage with all of the technical astuteness of a trained actor but with the relaxed self-interest of the most charming un-trained performer. They live each moment with deep and open energy that is exactly what you want to see from an all female theater company. Each actor brings her own unique worldview to the stage in this perfectly balanced ensemble. Director Tanya Saracho tempers the course, dry wit of show with graceful movements, slick blocking and crystal clear focus. Mac Vaughey’s lush and communicative lighting design is nicely paired with the elegantly conceived set designed by Dan Matthews.

header The piece is not without it’s problems. The vignettes seem to be arranged in order of darkness of subject, leaving the last third to drag and become a bit uncomfortable. By the end of the play, the audience has caught on to the possibility that a lot of these stories are autobiographical (partly because of their presentation and partly because it says so in the program) and the final third of the show is actually hard to watch. By the end of the play, the women seem broken: the worst parts of their lives have been on display. It’s so personal and dense, at times it feels more like therapy than art. Maybe it’s a choice, but it ends on a bleak view of womanhood. Which is not to say it is not affective. It’s a show that resonates and lingers for days after it’s been experienced. Go see Lunatic(a)s at Chicago Dramatists, you’d be crazy to miss it!

Rating: ★★★½

December 5, 2009 | 2 Comments More