Category: Aggie Hewitt

REVIEW: The Emperor’s New Clothes (Chicago Shakes)

A fun and exciting new family musical

 

emperor's new clothes - entire cast

   
Chicago Shakespeare Theater  presents
 
The Emperor’s New Clothes
   
Book by David Holstein
Music/Lyrics by
Alan Schmuckler
Directed by
Rachel Rockwell
at
Chicago Shakespeare Theatre, Navy Pier (map)
through August 29th  |  tickets: $18-$23  |  more info

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

emperor's new clothesThe Emperor’s New Clothes, the classic children’s fable, has been fancifully modernized by Chicago Shakespeare Theater, who commissioned a new musical based on the Hans Christian Anderson story with music and lyrics by Alan Schmuckler and book by David Holstein

In the original tale, the Emperor is sold an outfit made out of what he believes to be invisible fabric. He is told that only intelligent people can see it, so, not wanting to be  thought foolish, he pretends that he sees clothing where there is none. All of his royal servants and most of the townspeople go along with him, not wanting to be called stupid. Finally, a child watching the Emperor walk by, calls out that the Emperor is not wearing anything at all. All of the people in the town get a real kick out of this, and the Emperor is humiliated. 

The Emperor’s New Clothes at Chicago Shakespeare begins with the same basic premise, but blends the classic fairy tale themes with modern conundrums. Sam (Megan Long), the Emperor’s idealistic, college bound daughter, wants her father to get over his materialistic obsession with clothes, and open his eyes to the plight of the peasants. Meanwhile, Kimberly (Alex Goodrich), the son of Mama Swindler (Anne Gunn) the corruptible seamstress of the infamous invisible garments sees a better solution to save their failing business: e-commerce. Debbie Baer’s costumes continue the motif of mixing old and new: Mama wears a brown skirt and bodice while Sam walks around in jeans and a hoodie.  Kevin Depinet’s set is perfectly gaudy and extravagant. Its neon green and bright fuchsia paisley patterns are a whimsical fantasy, and the beautifully conceptualized and crafted set pieces create an engaging aesthetic.

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Directed by Rachel Rockwell, whose recent production of Ragtime (our review ★★★★) was a smash hit at Drury Lane last spring, knows her way around a musical – to put it lightly – and her youthful, feminine energy infuses the entire show. One of her strong suits with family theater is pacing. She keeps the story flowing in a lyrical and fluid way. Actors enter through the aisles and from the wings, and the choreography (also by Rockwell) has the same bouncy, young and fun energy as the rest of the show.

emperor's new clothes3 Alan Schmuckler’s poppy music is up-tempo and vivacious. His music maintains a steady lively pace throughout the show, keeping the production constantly engaging.

Ultimately, the play is a new take on an old fable. Hans Christian Anderson’s classic story has a moral at the end. We learn from it that we must speak our minds and use our common sense. This new version, with its parent/child conflicts, is a more complicated story for a newer, more astute family audience. Simplistic moral punch lines won’t work for today’s children, who have been raised on a diet of television and film that allow them to explore a deeper array of human emotion without necessarily trying to teach them anything. I wouldn’t say that there is no moral to this new imagining of The Emperor’s New Clothes, but I would say that it takes its time getting there, and the moral comes out of an exploration of the character’s relationships. The Emperor’s New Clothes is a fun and exciting new family musical.

   
   
Rating: ★★★½
   
   

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July 14, 2010 | 1 Comment More

REVIEW: 40 Whacks (Annoyance Theatre)

Rich Girl Gone Bad—Really, Really Bad

 

   
Annoyance Theatre presents
    
40 Whacks
   
Book/Lyrics by Aggie Hewitt
Music/Lyrics by
Lisa McQueen
Directed by
Irene Marquette
at
Annoyance Theatre, 4830 N. Broadway (map)
through August 6  |  tickets: $15  |  more info

reviewed by Paige Listerud (and, after the break, Barry Eitel)

Just who is Lizzie Borden to the average person today—a reclaimed feminist icon from the 19th-century or a poor little rich girl gone really, really bad? Lisa McQueen (music and lyrics) and Aggie Hewitt (book and lyrics) get to have it both ways with their masterful musical comedy 40 Whacks, now playing Fridays at the Annoyance Theatre. Truth to tell, Lizzie (Ellen Stoneking) wins audience applause at the end of the show because – after a wild ride of mayhem and mistrial – she gets away with it all.

Irene Marquette directs a cunning comidic cast, who lay it all on the line about the good ol’, bad ol’ days surrounding this murder, America’s sordid Gilded Age. Even if Lizzie is no feminist heroine—largely because the glass ceiling she bumps into is  about sharing part of her inheritance with her stepmother, Abby (Jennifer Estlin)—the show is, nevertheless, very conscious about the limitations women faced in the 1892, in and out of marriage. Lizzie’s father, Andrew Borden (Noah Gregoropolous), gets thoroughly hosed in the script as the Borden family’s patriarchal douche bag. But Gregoropolous’s dry, deadpan pronouncements on women’s menstrual cycles and mental states make us wish he wasn’t off to see his maker so quickly.

What amazes most about this production is its restraint. Marquette has adhered to a little more class and period consciousness than one usually sees in Annoyance productions. Higher production values in scenic design and costuming, coupled with hints of ragtime in McQueen’s musical score, give the audience a stronger sense of old-timey mass murder–all the better with which to sail into the production’s more off-the-wall, anachronistic moments. After a steady diet of arsenic poisoning and a failed attempt at getting medical help, Abby starts to make Uncle John’s (Mike Maltz) bed on the second floor. We know that her mortal comeuppance at Lizzie’s hands is imminent. However, Abby still gets a glorious swansong before her demise, covering the Carpenters’ 1972 hit “I’ll say goodbye to love.”

That’s not the end to this show’s imaginative flights of fancy. The cast knows how to pour it on for Lizzie’s trial, which Lizzie gets to observe through nothing less than a court-ordered morphine haze. Maltz is charming as Uncle John Morse–what with his little crush on the family Irish maid Bridget (Chelsea Farmer)–but he really excels at delivering the trippy, whacked out opening remarks as the prosecuting attorney. Cristin McAlister, demurely spoiled and vindictive as Lizzie’s sister Emma, really gets to step out and shake it as Lizzie’s defense. Sherman Edwards, as the casual and celebrity conscious judge overseeing trial proceedings, seals the circus for what it is. “Will you be dignified and respectful of the court system?” he mildly asks of the audience before Lizzie arrives. His understated delivery already informs us we need not be.

What seals the deal for this show is its excellent music. There are times when the score strays into operetta territory and that’s when I begin to ask whether the producers have created something a little beyond Annoyance’s typical schlock comedy fare. 40 Whacks definitely delivers more sophistication, while keeping a light, crude touch to get across Lizzie’s overwhelming sense of entitlement. I, of course, am screaming for more and I hope Annoyance’s audiences will too.

  
  
Rating: ★★★½
  

 

* Review #2 after the fold *

June 24, 2010 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: Sex Marks the Spot (New Lincoln Theatre)

Even a farce needs to be sincere

  Maggie Grahm and Tony Fiorentino star in Sex Marks the Spot, the incredibly funny political comedy playing at the Theatre Building Chicago.

  
New Lincoln Theatre presents
  
Sex Marks the Spot
  
Written by Charles Grippo
Directed by
Damian Arnold
at
Theatre Building Chicago, 1225 W. Belmont (map)
through July 25th  |  tickets: $26   | more info

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

Sex Marks the Spot is a farce about a political sex scandal. Or at least, it wants to be one. At the top of the play, Senator Clooney (Tony Fiorentino) is pacing around his office, badgering his assistant (Adam Schulmerich) as they attempt to finalize the big family values speech that he is going to deliver at tonight’s big debate with porn star Desiree Le Bonque. The reason he’s debating a porn star instead of a politician is Tony Fiorentino and Maggie  Graham star in  Sex Marks the Spot, the incredibly funny political comedy playing at the Theatre Building Chicagothat his opponent is a priest and, the men have decided that no one can debate a priest and come away from it looking good, so the big porn star offers herself up to be eaten alive in front of thousands of people, a task playwright Charles Grippo assumes, women like her have no problem with. Grippo punishes his audience with a list of Desiree’s films, with names like "Saturday Night Beaver" and "Free My Willy" which, may sound familiar to you, probably because they’re the oldest jokey porn names in the history of jokey porn names.

This kind of thoughtless writing doesn’t bode well for the farce genre, especially a farce like this one, which is in the Noises Off vein of slamming doors and timed exits. Grippo’s logic is faulty, and thus, so are his bits. The audience gets ahead of Grippo at the plays open, and it’s impossible for him to win them over. This is a play without one foot on the ground, nothing real or honest linking the words on stage to the people in the audience, except for it’s earnest cast.

This alone is not enough to garner the obvious venom on the tone of this review. What Charles Grippo is actually guilty of is creating a character that is a disgusting and offensive parody of a woman – a woman who is so broad and weakly conceived that the only characteristic she possesses is vague sycophantism and greed. The only choice this woman makes in the entirety of the play is to take off her clothes, which remain off for the duration of the show. When we finally meet Desiree Le Bonque, she is not written as a porn star, she is written as a whore. She is revealed to be having a secret affair with the senator, and she confronts the him with an ultimatum, marry me or I’ll tell. But it’s her reasoning that pushes her over the edge: she wants the one thing she can’t have: respect. So she asks to marry the one man who can give it to her. Farce or no farce, I can’t imagine a woman alive who still thinks this way, especially one who is supposed to be as successful as Desiree Le Bonque.

   

Adam Schulmerich and Tony Fiorentino star in Sex Marks the Spot, the incredibly funny political comedy playing at the Theatre Building Chicago Tony Fiorentino and Lisa Herceg star in  Sex Marks the Spot, the incredibly funny political comedy playing at the Theatre Building Chicago.

In a later scene, in which the truly talented Adam Schulmerich is forced to masquerade as Desiree, the scene escalates near to the point of rape, because of the supposed understanding that a denial of sex with the man in question will reveal that he is not, in fact, this woman. The scene is intended to be funny, but is actually one of the most disturbing scenes I have ever seen in a piece of live theater. It’s not the punchline of this joke that’s horrible, it’s the set up. It’s not the sex, or the sexualization, it’s the total lack of power and credibility this character has, and the information that the audience is supposed to take for granted, that makes for an extremely uncomfortable night of theater. Sex Marks the Spot is intended to be a comedy, but ultimately this is a play that is too far removed from humanity to parody the human condition.

  
  
Rating: ★½
  
  

Tony Fiorentino, Adam Schulmerich and  Maggie Graham star in  Sex Marks the Spot, the incredibly funny political comedy playing at the Theatre Building Chicago.

June 22, 2010 | 0 Comments More

Review: GL 2010 – Not Your Generic Latina (Teatro Luna)

Teatro Luna – Anything but generic!

  photo by Johnny Knight

   
Teatro Luna presents
      
GL 2010 – Not Your Generic Latina
  
Developed & Directed by Miranda Gonzalez
at
Chicago Dramatists, 1105 W. Chicago (map)
through July 11  |  tickets: $15-$20  |  more info 

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

Teatro Luna is a great theatre company. Billing themselves as "Chicago’s all Latina theatre company," Teatro Luna brings Latina actresses, writers and directors together to collaboratively compose all original material. Their new show, GL 2010, is styled as a review, made up of a series of vignettes, songs, and movement pieces. GL stands photo by Johnny Knight for Generic Latina, and shares a name with Teatro Luna’s first production. Although the material is all new, it is generated by the same idea as the original: what does the phrase "Generic Latina" mean?

As the audience enters, they are met with a particularly noticeable pre-show soundtrack, a hodgepodge of electronica music and samples from what sounds like a particularly dark telenovela. The walls of the set are absolutely covered with Spanish-language posters for movies, bands and night clubs; as well as a graffiti-style stencils of Mexican wrestling masks, ice cream trucks and Virgin Marys. The show starts with a bang, when a red jump suited audience member flies out of her seat and plows onto the stage to perform a high energy rap about her Latina experience, denying that there is anything generic about her at all. This opening number is representative of Teatro Luna at its very best: controlled, focused energy exploding with the joy of performance. After this first opening number, a gang of three mothers of adult children take the stage, a vignette that will be replicated twice during the show. The three women come from different Spanish speaking countries and discuss their cultural differences, and their shared worries about their children. Teatro Luna always takes its time to explore as many angles of Latina life as possible. The three mothers are vessels through which the culture is examined externally: the writer/performers themselves look at a part of their culture that they are much to young to experience and explore it like curious children, eager to show their findings.

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GL 2010 is more reserved than the company’s previous shows. With a cast that welcomes a few new writer/performers, GL 2010 has the intellectual weight one expects from a Luna show, but comes off as emotionally guarded. Scenes are generated from autobiographical stories, which has given a raw, emotional edge to past shows like Lunaticas. It makes sense that GL 2010 would become more  intellectual than emotional: the premise of the show is to investigate what a Generic GL 2010_007Latina means, and to blow up that stereotype – and external struggle rather than an internal one.

There are some emotional highlights in GL 2010, however. Lauren Villegas‘ courtroom monologue is emotionally stirring and captivating, and the rap performances that act as a Greek Chorus in this show manage to both contain lots of thought-provoking information and have a warm emotional side. Teatro Luna is at its best during large, vibrant group scenes although some of the larger numbers in GL 2010 aren’t quite fully realized. An ode to the nightmarish act of female body waxing has the potential to be a major show stopper, but its viewpoint is too weak to be very ratable.

The women of Teatro Luna are a powerful force, and the work they put into their collaborative shows is evident in their product. GL 2010 isn’t a perfect show, but Teatro Luna is one of the coolest theater companies out there.

   
   
Rating: ★★½
 
 
June 15, 2010 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: The Better Doctor (Silent Theater Company)

Multi-talented performers struggle to find show’s unique voice

 

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Bootstraps Comedy Theater, in association with Silent Theatre presents
   
 
The Better Doctor
  
written and directed by Matt Lyle
at
Prop Thtr, 3504 N. Elston (map)
through June 26th  |  tickets: $15  |  more info

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

Silent Theater Company’s gimmick is what it sounds like: theatre in the style of old silent movies. It opens the door for some awesome physical performances and it even creates a template by which to tell topical stories in a universal way. Such is the case with The Better Doctor, Matt Lyle’s new play about sick, broke kids and the heroic tramp Velma (Kim Lyle), who is dedicated to finding them healthcare.

better-doctor-3 The show begins when the musicians take the stage.  Eric Loughlin on piano and Chris Jett on percussion sit on either side of the stage, bookending the action. The show does not lack energy, or innovation. Matt Lyle, who also directs, comes up with authentic and entertaining bits. Old-fashioned showmanship takes over as the performers charm the audience with sleight of hand tricks and big, blown-out characters.

The plot is simple, campy and a direct throwback to the simplistic storylines that showcased the comedic genius of Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton, but with a new, political twist. There are ways in which the live-action adaptation of the stylized, antiquated form of silent movie performance works very well. The exaggerated physicality is extremely theatrical, and evokes the feeling of a classic mime routine. The performers take on the athletic challenge with aplomb and grace. Heather Forsythe, who is well utilized for a supporting player demonstrates a knack for physical comedy, and graces the stage with a youthful sass. Her performance, while presentational as her fellow actors, betrays the hint of grounded humanity that made Buster Keaton a true comedic master. The same can be said for lead actor Samuel Zelitch, who’s bumbling medical intern character is straight from the classics.

Kim Lyle’s performance is plucky and confident, and it’s nice to see a woman hero in this context. As Velma, she uses her brawn and wit to find medical care for the three sick little scamps, joining forces with a Buster Keaton-ish intern. The trap and the stone-face team up to fight the powers that be, in this case the wicked Chief of Medicine, played by actor/improviser Mike Brunlieb. The play unfolds in an episodic manor, similar to the silent films that inspired it. Although the scenes progress to create a fluid piece, this is better-doctor-5secondary; each scene’s primary purpose is to open the door for comedy bits.

Around three quarters of the way through, The Better Doctor begins to lag.  During the big chase scene, which gets off to a funny, if precious, start, ends up spiraling down a dark road. As the chase dissolves into a keystone cops parody, the The Better Doctor becomes a show that relies too heavily on a clever premise, without taking ownership of itself. The Better Doctor, while paying faithful homage to the silent greats, has too weak a grasp on its own voice. A silent play that is too stylistically referential, The Better Doctor is to be cutesy at times, and gimmicky at it’s worst.  Bootstraps Comedy Theater needs to revisit this play, and cultivate what is universally true about this show. A little more honesty, and The Better Doctor could be a four star show.

  
   
Rating: ★★½
 
 

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June 13, 2010 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: Blue Man Group – Chicago

Turning an event into a celebration

 Photo by David Hawe

  
Blue Man Productions present
 
Blue Man Group
   
at Briar Street Theatre, 3133 N. Halsted (map)
Open Run  |  tickets: $54-$64  |  more info

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

photo by David HaweBlue Man Group, with it’s on going shows in nine different international cities, 700 employees and a cumulative audience of 12 million plus and counting is certainly not hurting for press. In fact, after running at the Briar Street Theater since 1997, Blue Man Group is still selling out midweek performances. The show, which is self described, “modern vaudeville” combines technological elements like projected animation and LED screens, old-fashioned comedy and magic routines, as well as music made with tubes. And of course, all of this is presented by three hairless, earless Blue Men, or rather one Blue Man, played by three actors.

The three race-less men wander around the audience, exploring new the world around them as if they’ve never seen it before, staring into the eyes of their audience members trying to find a connection. The show, which is an entertainment extravaganza, and builds to a totally 90’s party atmosphere, is an exploration of how people communicate and relate in a world of mass media, information overload and cyber saturation. Blue Man Group is reputed to be a spectacle and not much else by some, when in fact, the show’s substance is thoughtful, solemn and at times very angry. The rave environment that the event turns into is not just about having a good time, it’s about people connecting on a primal level. By eliminating a narrative, Blue Man Group has created a performance that is entirely about a personal connection with their audience, from start to finish.

Most people are already familiar with Blue Man Group, even if they haven’t seen the show. Their act has been featured in newspapers and magazines, as well as heavy hitting daytime and late night talk shows. The technical proficiency of the actors is noted by the masses, and rightly so. The work that goes into the performance of this show is powerful, clean and honest.

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There is not question of the talent or the intelligence of this show; the question at hand is: how is a group of performance artists this weird this popular? With relatively few changes to the script since it’s creation, it’s hard to imagine how the show stays so fresh. It helps that the questions asked in the 90’s about technology and communication have only deepened as we’ve passed though the 2000’s. In their introduction to the tube instrument that the blue men famously plays, a video presentation introduces the concept. It reminds us that we live in a grid of interconnected channels so expansive that it’s size is virtually unquantifiable. What is the grid? Modern plumbing. Reminding us that we live in a community, that is actually physically connected by objects and things – as opposed to online data – may have  been a clever statement in 1997, but in 2010 it feels almost revolutionary. As  communication and information become ever increasing, these questions posed by 90’s artists become more and more relevant.

Photo by Eric McNattThe sheer entertainment of the piece is also a major factor. The show turns into a celebration, and it’s virtually impossible not to partake.

The smartest thing Blue Man Group does in terms of ensuring their sustainability is to make this show mind-numbingly fun. The show is not to be watched; rather, it’s to be experienced. This makes for a show that people will continue coming back to. Every audience member is involved in the show, and therefore has a personal relationship with it. Die hard fans of this show see it again and again, and something that is so hard to describe seems mysterious enough that hoards of new audience members are eager to find out what the story is with this enigmatic show.

Blue Man Group is a treat. It’s an event, and it’s enthralling. This show is a lot of spectacle, but with a lot of thought put into it as well. Perhaps most importantly, it’s the kind of show that makes people who don’t normally see theater get out and buy a ticket! Everyone wants to see Blue Man Group, the same way that everyone wants to see a big summer blockbuster. And the fact that this show manages to create something like this, and actually respect the intellect of their audience, might be one of the most notable theatrical feats of the 90’s, 2000’s and beyond.

   
   
Rating: ★★★★
 
 

Photo by Darbe Rotach


 

 

     
     
June 8, 2010 More

REVIEW: The Marriage of Bette and Boo (Village Players)

A reverent treatment of Durang’s classic American play

 

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Village Players Theater presents
 
The Marriage of Bette and Boo
 
by Christopher Durang
Directed by
Dan Taube
at
Village Players Theater, 1010 W. Madison, Oak Park (map)
through June 27  tickets: $20-$25  |  more info

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

Oak Park’s Village Players Theater is closing out it’s season of “New American Classics” with The Marriage of Bette and Boo, Christopher Durang’s 1985 tragicomedy about a son reliving the painful memories of his parents marriage. Known for being a personal and autobiographical work, The Marriage of Bette and Boo is so popular for it’s sharp black humor and piercingly intense characters that it’s  become almost cliché. It’s the source of the “lost babies” monologue, a piece so rich with nuance, depth and wit that it’s made its way onto “do not use” list of many acting classes because of overuse.

DSC01487It’s no wonder that actors are drawn to Durang’s work. Bette and Boo has amazing characters, from Emily, the neurotic aunt who is full of self loathing and eagerness to apologize for transgressions she hasn’t committed – played by funny and energetic Megan E. Brown, to the hilariously contemptible priest, who’s just so over having to help his stupid parishioners (Dennis Schnell, whose priest monologue is a show stopper, on the night I saw him it received applause).

With a talented cast and a winning play, there was little director Dan Taube could have done to mess this production up and in fact, he enhanced it. Taube brings out the sadness in this work, lifting the veil of levity in every scene. Although it is a fast passed play, Taube does not shy away from taking time when it is needed to shine a spotlight on an emotional moment. Dan Taube’s direction is the invisible kind: one doesn’t really notice any direction at all, only the story that he has facilitated.

25 years after it was written, The Marriage of Bette and Boo is still a challenging piece of theater. The manic style in which it is written, and the darkness of its subject matter, make it at times difficult to watch. It also feels, well, dated. In 2010 it is no longer en vogue to deliver highly academic, sardonically funny monologues about how much one hates one’s parents (unfortunately). Stephanie Sullivan is an unsympathetic Bette, leaving one to feel that this play might just be a two-and-a-half hour long complaint about Christopher Durang’s mother. Sullivan is a strong actress, and when she is able to find moments of humanity in Bette, they are poignant and lovely (most notably in the aforementioned “lost babies” monologue) but the character – a mother who relentlessly demands to be impregnated, only to drag her family through hell with still births again and again – is as hard for the audience to love as it is for her narrating son.

Modern audiences might feel as if they are watching a very 1980’s dramady with this production, which is extremely well done but does little to innovate or modernize this “new American classic.” Most notably, the set, designed by Annette Vargas, has a super 1980’s feel. Three tall panels are designed with a brightly-colored square pattern that looks like neon stained glass. It’s pretty, and old fashioned looking, and yet somehow it works.

This Village Player’s stuck-in-the-past production is fitting – how for a play about remorse, loss and memory. How something like The Marriage of Bette and Boo could be contemporized would be a challenge. The play seems destined to stay in the 1980’s, to remain a living monument to the year of its creation. Whether or not Dan Taube is correct when he says, “One day people will look at Durang’s body of work and the innovation and the vision and put him in a class with American masters like O’Neill and Williams,” this production, presented with the loyalty and reverence of a period piece, surely supports that hypothesis.

 
 
Rating: ★★★
 
 

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May 18, 2010 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: The Regulars (Hobo Junction Productions)

More regular than epic

 

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Hobo Junction Productions presents
 
The Regulars
 
Written and directed by Josh Zagoren
at
Apollo Theater, 2540 N. Lincoln (map)
through June 13th  |  tickets: $15  |  more info

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

The Regulars, an epic rock musical comedy about waiters is a new rock musical-comedy about, well, waiters, presented by Hobo Junction Productions. The audience is presented with the following warning tucked neatly inside their programs, "Caution: This production is meant to strictly Regulars_Hank_Molly make you laugh. We are not trying to make a comment on the human condition. We do comedies…and that’s what they are meant to do… make you laugh." What follows is an hour and fifteen minute dissertation on the human condition. Love, sex, violence and work are major themes in The Regulars, and although it is a musical farce, it is certainly a comment on life as a working, single white person in present day America.

The Regulars opens on a motley crew of waiters in the break room of a chain steakhouse. They spit venom at one another, and meet the new girl Molly (Danelle Wildermuth), who the women hate but the men amorously adore.  With their tough-as-nails demeanor and utter contempt for their job, the crew tries to prepare Molly for the hellish work night she has ahead of her. But nothing can prepare her for the mini-Vietnam that is dinner service at Laconia Steakhouse. The waiters come to the break room with increasingly stained and tattered clothes, and everything that can go wrong does; they run out of sugar and ketchup and secret shoppers from corporate show up.

With paper-thin characters and less-than earth-shattering plot points, writer/director Josh Zagoren has created a show that has no choice but to have absolutely hilarious scenes and dialogue. Unfortunately, The Regulars falls flat. While there are funny moments, Zagoren doesn’t push the envelope far enough. The audience is teased with the promise of a kinky new girl/stock boy love affair, but is given little more than a double entendre about a long rubber hose. You don’t need raunch for comedy, but if a writer puts something dirty or subversive out there, Chicago audiences are sophisticated enough to want to see it pay off. Comedy is in no short supply here in Chicago, which means, if a show claims to exist for the sole purpose of being funny, it had better be really, really funny, which unfortunately The Regulars is not.

     
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There are of course, amusing elements within the production. The funniest character is the sleazy newly-promoted headwaiter Simon, played by the subtly weird and awesome Bryan Campbell. Campbell plays the part with a bizarre innocence, making Simon’s cheesy moves easy to watch. Campbell also has one of the funnier songs, a 1950’s-style rock ode to a mediocre bar the crew goes to after work, “The Billy Bar.” Campbell, like the rest of the cast has a strong singing voice, stronger than the voices you’ll hear in a traditional comedy show in Chicago. Clara Kessler as Denise, the militaristic manager has the strongest voice in the cast, and a nice levity in her performance.

Sadly, levity isn’t enough to hang one’s hat on, despite The Regulars being a competently structured farce, with fun music and gifted actors. And Josh Zagoren is a talented writer and director – way too talented to write a show off as being comedy for comedy’s sake. Every successful comedy is a comment on the human condition, whether it admits it or not. There is a lot of rage underlying this piece about low-income workers in an overbearing job, and if Zagoren trusted himself enough to nurture that a little more, this could be a really funny play. Unfortunately, comedy for comedy’s sake doesn’t stand a chance of being more than cute, and in this town, just being cute doesn’t cut it.

  
  
Rating: ★★
  
  

Run time is approximately one hour with no intermission.

WHERE: Apollo Theater * 2540 North Lincoln Avenue.  Running Dates: May 7th thru June 13th – Fri. and Sat. @ 8:00 p.m & Sun @ 3:00 pm. Tickets: $15.00 – Call (773) 935-6100 or Purchase online at www.ticketmaster.com


Regulars_Anthony_Autumn CAST: Jake Autizen as Bear, Eli Branson as Anthony, Madeline Chilese as Autumn, Derek Elstro as Hank, Danelle Wildermuth as Molly, Ashley Wint as Sunny, Carla Kessler as Denise, Bryan Campbell as Simon, Cyra K. Polizzi as Ana the Bus Girl

CREW:
Playwright – Josh Zagoren
Music by – Josh Zagoren & Dan Krall
Music Orchestrated by – Joe Griffin & Mike Przygoda
Director – Josh Zagoren
Stage Manager – Amy Hopkins
Tech Director – Amy Hopkins
Costume Designer – Janna Weddle
Set Designer – Amy Hopkins
Lighting Designer – Amy Hopkins

 

     
    
May 13, 2010 | 0 Comments More