Tag: Aly Renee Amidei

Raven Theatre's

Review: The Coward (Stage Left Theatre)

Kate Black-Spence as Isabelle and Brian Plocharcyzk as Lucidus in Stage Left Theatre's "The Coward" by Nick Jones, directed by Vance Smith. (photo credit: Johnny Knight)        
      
The Coward

Written by Nick Jones 
Directed by Vance Smith 
at Theater Wit, 1229 W. Belmont (map)
thru Oct 5  |  tickets: $20-$30   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review
     

September 20, 2014 | 0 Comments More

Review: Pontypool (Strawdog Theatre)

Jamie Vann stars as Grant Mazzy in Strawdog Theatre's "Pontypool" by Tony Burgess, directed by Anderson Lawfer. (photo credit: Tom McGrath)       
      
Pontypool 

Adapted by Tony Burgess 
Directed by Anderson Lawfer
at Strawdog Theatre, 3829 N. Broadway (map)
thru Feb 1  |  tickets: $15   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review
     

January 12, 2014 | 1 Comment More

Review: Detective Partner Hero Villain (Strawdog Theatre)

Marc Rita stars as Partner in Strawdog Theatre's "Detective Partner Hero Villain" by Brett Neveu, directed by Gus Menary. (photo credit: Tom McGrath)        
      
Detective Partner
                Hero Villain

Written by Brett Neveu
Directed by Gus Menary
at Strawdog Theatre, 3829 N. Broadway (map)
thru Dec 17  |  tickets : $15   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review
     

December 4, 2013 | 1 Comment More

Review: Facing Angela (Ruckus Theater)

Neal Starbird and Susan Myburgh star in The Ruckus Theater's "Facing Angela" by Scott T. Barsotti, directed by Kyra Lewandowski. (photo credit: Gerard Van Halsema)        
       
Facing Angela 

Written by Scott T. Barsotti 
Directed by Kyra Lewandowski
Athenaeum Theatre, 2936 N. Southport (map)
thru July 28  |  tickets: $12-$17   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

July 7, 2013 | 1 Comment More

Review: The Three Musketeers (Lifeline Theatre)

Deanna Myers and Glenn Stanton in Three Musketeers at Lifeline Theatre        
       
The Three Musketeers 

Book by Alexandre Dumas
Adapted by Robert Kauzlaric
Directed by Amanda Delheimer Dimond
at Lifeline Theatre, 6912 N. Glenwood (map)
thru July 21  |  tickets: $40   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

June 11, 2013 | 0 Comments More

Review: Pontypool (Strawdog Theatre)

Jamie Vann, as Mazzy, stars in Strawdog Theatre Hugen Hall's "Pontypool" by Tony Burgess, directed by Anderson Lawfer. (photo credit: Tom McGrath)        
       
Pontypool 

Written and Adapted by Tony Burgess   
Directed by Anderson Lawfer  
Strawdog Theatre, 3829 N. Broadway (map)
thru Nov 4  |  tickets: $15   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

October 18, 2012 | 1 Comment More

Review: The Life of Death (WildClaw Theatre)

Casey Cunningham and Steve Herson star in WildClaw Theatre's "The Life of Death," adapted by Charley Sherman, directed by Carolyn Klein. (photo credit: Kevin Mullaney)        
       
The Life of Death  

Adapted by Charley Sherman  
Directed by Carolyn Klein
DCA Storefront Theater, 66 E. Randolph (map)
thru Nov 4  |  tickets: $15-$25   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

October 13, 2012 | 0 Comments More

Review: The Woman in White (Lifeline Theatre)

Walter Hartright (Nicholas Bailey, left) and Laura Fairlie (Maggie Scrantom, right) must oncover the secret of the woman in white; in Lifeline Theatre’s world premiere production of “The Woman in White." Photo by Suzanne Plunkett.        
       
The Woman in White 

Adapted by Robert Kauzlaric  
Directed by Elise Kauzlaric
at Lifeline Theatre, 6912 N. Glenwood (map)
thru Oct 28  |  tickets: $20-$40   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

September 17, 2012 | 2 Comments More

Review: The Duchess of Malfi (Strawdog Theatre)

Lindsey Dorcus, Justine C. Turner, Joshua Davis, Stephen Dunn in Strawdog Theatre's "The Duchess of Malfi", directed by Brandon Bruce. (photo credit: Chris Ocken)       
      
The Duchess of Malfi 

Written by John Webster
Directed by Brandon Bruce  
at Strawdog Theatre, 3829 N. Broadway (map)
thru May 26   |  tickets: $28   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

April 24, 2012 | 0 Comments More

Review: Kill Me (WildClaw Theatre)

Sasha Gioppo (Cam) and Jude Roche (Angst) - Kill Me, WildClaw       
      
Kill Me 

Written by Scott T. Barsotti 
Directed by Jeff Christian  
Athenaeum Theatre, 2936 N. Southport (map)
thru March 18  |  tickets: $20-$25   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
Check out Kill Me educational guide
     
         
        Read entire review
     

February 18, 2012 | 1 Comment More

Review: The Count of Monte Cristo (Lifeline Theatre)

     
Chris Hainsworth and Jenifer Tyler - Count of Monte Cristo
The Count of Monte Cristo
 

Adapted by Christopher M. Walsh
Based on book by Alexandre Dumas 
Directed by Paul S. Holmquist
at Lifeline Theatre, 6912 N. Glenwood (map)
thru Oct 30  |  tickets: $32-$35  |  more info

Check for half-price tickets

     Read entire review

     
September 21, 2011 | 2 Comments More

Review: Watership Down (Lifeline Theatre)

  
  

A hopping fantasy adventure

 
  

Hazel-rah (Paul S. Holmquist) and his warren - Watership Down

   
Lifeline Theatre presents
  
  
Watership Down   
   
  
Adapted by John Hildreth
from book by Richard Adams
Directed by
Katie McLean Hainsworth
Original music by Mikhail Fiksel
at
Lifeline Theatre, 6912 N Glenwood (map)
through June 19  | 
tickets: $20-$35   |   more info

Reviewed by Jason Rost

Having not read Richard Adamscritically acclaimed 1972 novel, “Watership Down”, I was a little concerned about getting lost with the mythology in Lifeline Theatre’s new adaptation, just judging by the length of the novel and how much would need to be condensed. While the world of rabbit gods and legends with names like Frith and El-ahrairah can be a little much to take in at first, John Hildreth’s stage adaptation doesn’t take long to captivate as you escape into this world. If you are the type who found no pleasure in any of the “Lord of the Rings” films, or just can’t get past the idea As told in legend, El-ahrairah (Paul S. Holmquist, right), Prince of Rabbits, and Rabscuttle (Scott T. Barsotti, left) enter the burrow of the Black Rabbit of Inlé on a quest to save their people; in Lifeline Theatre’s world premiere production of “Watership Down,” adapted by John Hildreth, directed by Katie McLean Hainsworth, based on the bestselling novel by Richard Adams. (Photo: Suzanne Plunkett)of humans playing rabbits (mostly without the pointy ears), then this fanciful tale may not be for you. However, if you can allow your imagination to escape in director Katie McLean Hainsworth’s smart, physical, and visually exciting (yet never over the top in spectacle) production, then you’re in for a fun adventure.

Hildreth’s adaptation, as with any good literary adaptation, strives to stay true to the core heart of the book while ensuring that the action on stage is constantly moving the story forward remaining compelling to watch. Hildreth begins Adams’ tale with Fiver (Scott T. Barsotti), a young rabbit who has clairvoyant abilities. He senses destruction coming to this particular rabbit warren (stemming from human intervention). He confides this information to his brother Hazel (Paul S. Holmquist) and they inform the Chief Rabbit of the warren (played with unpredictable eccentricity by Matt Kahler). After the Chief Rabbit ignores Fiver’s warnings, Hazel makes the decision to put together a band of fellow rabbits from the warren and venture out in search of a new home safe from danger. With the help of rabbits such as Blackberry (a perfectly cast Chris Daley), an extremely intelligent rabbit (in a modern context very aptly named), and Bigwig (a strong and complex performance by Christopher M. Walsh), who has the brawn of the group.

Throughout their journey they meet new friends, enemies and obstacles before they ultimately reach their destination of an ideal new home called Watership Down. It is the Lincoln Park condo of rabbit fields, luxury rabbit living with all the amenities. The only issue for their survival is that this troop is all male. They need female rabbits in their warren if they hope to thrive. With the assistance of a wounded gull they help heal, Kehaar (a bold scene-stealing performance by Jesse Manson), they discover female rabbits at a nearby farm in captivity. They manage to bring back one, Clover (a charming Chelsea Paice).

The other expedition proves to be much more treacherous as Bigwig goes undercover in what’s essentially a totalitarian rabbit warren where the females are enslaved and utilized strictly for breeding. Hazel and the gang lead a rescue mission to save the females and ultimately defend their new warren against General Woundwart (a deliciously evil Dave Skvarla) and his fascist army of scar marked rabbits. Hildreth also finds time to integrate scenes involving El-ahrairah (also played by Holmquist), the folk-hero prince of rabbits who characterizes all of the virtues rabbits aspire to. While intriguing, the jumps to these scenes occasionally take the air out of the action. All the while, the audience is free to connect the themes and motifs of the story to a multitude of religious and historical parallels including Christianity, WWII and the founding of Rome including the rape of the Sabine women (pretty thought-provoking for a tale about bunnies).

Scott T. Barsotti as Fiver (left) and Paul S. Holmquist as Hazel (right) in Lifeline Theatre's "Watership Down".  (Photo: Suzanne Plunkett)Hainsworth’s direction keeps things rather simple by choosing to avoid transforming the actors fully into rabbits, and instead focuses on the physicality. At times, she does have some difficulty grappling with stage pictures when the majority of the ensemble is on stage in this compact space. Also, the opening pacing drags slightly but that is coupled with the simple fact that there’s a lot of mythology being thrown at the audience in the initial scenes of Hildreth’s script.

In his double duty as movement designer, Holmquist helps create varied and fascinating choices in the physical performances of the ensemble. Richard Gilbert and Dave Gregory of R & D Choreography enhance the production greatly with their acrobatic and theatrical violence design. Matt Engle is a standout in his dynamic fights. Wenhai Ma’s set creates some excellent levels and provides a good playground for the actors to play scenes in various locations including into the audience. Joanna Iwanicka’s puppet and mask design echoes the recent Broadway Equus, but is entirely appropriate and meshes well with Hainworth’s minimal concept. Her video design provides some gorgeous, yet not too distracting abstract landscapes, however the glowing orb of the god Frith is perhaps a little too makeshift and underwhelming.

Watership Down is a faithful adaptation fit perfectly for the Lifeline Theatre aesthetic. It could certainly have gone in a more fanciful and spectacular direction (imagine a stage full of Easter bunny suits), but Hainsworth’s concept along with Aly Renee Amidei’s contemporary costumes (the farm rabbits’ preppy clothing is a gas) keeps the characters and themes of the story relatable and grounded for us human observers. This certainly requires your mind to fill in some gaps in the imagery, but for the willing audience member, the effort is well worth the journey in the end. With a dedicated and creative ensemble tackling this largely fascinating adaptation, I think it’s safe to say, “Lifeline has done it again.”

  
  
Rating: ★★★
  
  

Jesse Manson as Kehaar (left) and Christopher M. Walsh as Bigwig (right) in Lifeline Theatre's "Watership Down". (Photo: Suzanne Plunkett)

Lifeline Theatre presents Watership Down, running April 29—June 19, 2011 at Lifeline Theatre, 6912 N. Glenwood Ave. (free parking and shuttle). Regular performance times are Thursdays and Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturdays at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sundays at 4 p.m. Tickets are $35 for regular single tickets on Saturdays and Sundays, $32 for regular single tickets on Thursdays and Fridays, $27 for seniors, $20 for students, and $20 rush tickets. Tickets may be purchased at the Lifeline Theatre Box Office, 773.761.4477, or by visiting www.lifelinetheatre.com.

  
  
May 14, 2011 | 1 Comment More