Tag: Gene Van Dyke

Review: Don’t Give That Beast a Name (The Mammals)

Erin Orr as Marie, in The Mammals' "Don't Give That Beast a Name," by Randall Colburn and Bob Fisher, continues through November 3rd at Zoo Studio.        
       
Don’t Give That Beast a Name 

Written by Randall Colburn and Bob Fisher
Directed by Bob Fisher
at Zoo Studio, 4001 N. Ravenswood (map)
thru Nov 3  |  tickets: $20   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

September 25, 2012 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: The Meatlocker (The Mammals Theatre)

Taking risks, The Mammals creates visually terrifying tableau

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The Mammals presents
 
The Meatlocker
 
written/directed by Bob Fisher
at
Zoo Studio, 4001 N. Ravenswood (map)
thru May 14th  | tickets: $20 suggested donation  more info

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

The Meatlocker, the new play written and directed by The Mammals artistic director Bob Fisher is a dark and heady comedic drama set in the creepy world of 1930’s boxing. The play’s titular character, The Meatlocker (Dave Goss), is a boxer who can’t go down for the count. He’s haunted by a demon who warns him that if he stays on meatlocker 014 the floor of the ring until the ref counts to ten, he will never get up again. Tormented by demons and faced with the material world threat of tough guy bookies who want him to take a dive, Meat and his manager, Manny (David Lykins) are men without options. 

In the small black basement that is the Zoo Studio, an opaque shower curtain is all that separates the audience from the deep stage. The back wall is completely lined with news papers. As the first scene opens, Meat is lying on a workout bench, directly under a single yellow light bulb, the only source of illumination in the entire scene. Lovely little risks like this make The Meatlocker one of the most visually intriguing shows of the season. Bob Fisher lingers on visceral images; tableaus of a woman walking alone downs a dark alley; the cold looks in the crowd as a boxer enters the ring, to season the performance. The effects are haunting and engaging, and lend themselves to the overall cartoonishness of this imaginative production. Nothing about this play is subtle, from the staging to the acting to the characters, which like the tableaus they inhabit are painted with the broad strokes.

Stitch, the evil demon played by Adam Dodds (who also designed costumes) has the body of Richard III and the voice of a distorted Jimmy Stewart – which is literally amplified by bizarre and brilliant choice to dress him in a live headset microphone. 

The character of The Meatlocker is a terrified child in the body of a (literally) ice cold man. He is constantly in anguish, addled by the visions of a recurring phantom. The world he lives in, then, is a dark place filled with creatures of the night, human 0oddballs who tempt his sanity as much as the ghost does. Whether or not Stitch is real or not is irrelevant. The play is scary, and thought-provoking in it’s brutality.

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The Meatlocker drips testosterone. The one woman in the play, A.J. The Reporter (strongly played by Nicolle Van Dyke) is as tough, or tougher, than her male counterparts, to the point that she has a late night, dark alley conversation with tough guy Rudy the Rhino (the truly terrifying Gabe Garza), who initiates the conversation by jumping out of the shadows and threatening to rape her. There is not a motivation in the world that would keep a woman in that situation, and this choice may be the weakest moment in the show. The ultra-masculinity of The Meatlocker is what makes it great, but like its hero, it is also its greatest flaw.

 
Rating: ★★★
 
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The Meatlocker runs Friday & Saturday, 8pm, at Zoo Studio, 4001 N. Ravenswood.  BYOB!  $20 suggested donation.  Reservations can be made by calling 866-593-4614.

Cast:  Roy Gonzalez, Adam Dodds, Fred Mowery, Nicolle Van Dyke, Vinny Lacey, David Lykins, Gene Van Dyke, Gabe Garza

           
April 20, 2010 | 0 Comments More