Tag: Jack McCabe

Review: Psychonaut Librarians (The New Colony)

Christine Mayland Perkins and Matt Farabee star in Psychonaut Librarians, New Colony           
      
  

Psychonaut Librarians 

Written by Sean Kelly
The Den Theatre, 1333 N. Milwaukee (map)
thru Feb 12  |  tix: $20  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

January 29, 2017 | 1 Comment More

Review: Crime and Punishment (Mary-Arrchie Theatre)

Ed Porter stars in Mary-Arrchie Theatre's "Crime and Punishment," adapted by Marilyn Campbell and Curt Columbus, directed by Richard Cotovsky. (photo credit: Emily Schwartz)        
      
Crime and Punishment

Adapted by Marilyn Campbell and Curt Columbus
From novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Directed by Richard Cotovsky
at Angel Island, 735 W. Sheridan (map)
thru March 16  |  tickets: $20-$25   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review 
     

February 11, 2014 | 1 Comment More

Review: Hellcab (Profiles Theatre, 2013)

Megan Hickey and Paul Dillon star in Profiles Theatre's "Hellcab" by Will Kern, directed by Darrell W. Cox. (photo credit: Michael Brosilow)        
      
Hellcab

Written by Will Kern 
Directed by Darrell W. Cox
Profiles Theatre, 4139 N. Broadway (map)
thru Jan 12  |  tickets: $35-$40   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review
     

November 16, 2013 | 8 Comments More

Review: Spoon River Anthology (Provision Theater)

Lia Mortensen stars in Provision Theater's "Spoon River Anthology", adapted and directed by Timothy Gregory. (photo credit: Megan Gallagher)        
      
Spoon River Anthology

Written by Edgar Lee Master
Adapted and Directed by Timothy Gregory
Provision Theater, 1001 W. Roosevelt (map)
thru June 16  |  tickets: $10-$32   |  more info
       
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May 11, 2013 | 0 Comments More

Review: A Permanent Image (LiveWire Chicago Theatre)

Jack McCabe and Ed Dzialo star in LiveWire Chicago's "A Permanent Image" by Samuel D. Hunter, directed by Joshua Aaron Weinstein. (photo credit: Austin Oie)        
       
A Permanent Image 

Written by Samuel D. Hunter
Directed by Joshua Aaron Weinstein
DCASE Storefront Theater, 66 E. Randolph (map)
thru May 5  |  tickets: $12-$15   |  more info
       
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        Read entire review
     

   
April 7, 2013 | 1 Comment More

Review: Hellcab (Profiles Theatre)

Konstantin Khrustov (as the cab driver) stars in Profile Theatre's "Hellcab" by Will Kern, directed by Darrell W. Cox (photo credit: Michael Brosilow)        
      
Hellcab 

Written by Will Kern 
Directed by Darrell W. Cox 
at Profiles Theatre, 4139 N. Broadway (map)
thru Dec 23  |  tickets: $35-$40   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

November 17, 2012 | 1 Comment More

Review: The Seven (The Neapolitans)

Caroline Latta in A Pill, The Seven, The Neopolitans Theatre        
       
The Seven 

at Viaduct Theatre, 3111 N. Western (map)
thru Oct 7  |  tickets: $10-$20   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
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September 26, 2012 | 0 Comments More

Review: Slaughter City (Jackalope Theatre)

  
  

Disciplined, persuasive production nobly delves into tough subjects

     
     

Ryan Heindl in Naomi Wallace's "Slaughter City", produced by Jackalope Theatre.

  
Jackalope Theatre presents
   
  
Slaughter City
    
  
Written by Naomi Wallace
Directed by Kaiser Ahmed
at Raven Theatre’s West Stage, 6157 N. Clark (map)
through June 4  |  tickets: $15  |  more info

Reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

Naomi Wallace is a committed playwright. She wants her audiences to be equally so, to meet her stories more than half way. Poetic vignettes that defy any consistent time frame, these two hours and twenty minutes of archetypal scenes focus on a packing house in a Brechtian-like factory called Slaughter City.

Ryan Heindl and Kristin Anderson in Naomi Wallace's "Slaughter City", produced by Jackalope TheatreBut that’s as much focus as you get. Mostly the play offers glimpses of the ongoing struggle of the labor movement to be honored, as in fairly compensated, for the work that made America, not just plutocrats, prosper. Wisconsin is only the latest scene of a battle for the soul of America, which is the decency it shows its workers. Fittingly, Jackalope Theatre’s disciplined and persuasive production does it justice.

Wallace offers scenes and work songs of workers and some scabs agitating for a new contract in a slaughterhouse that gives them 20-minute breaks, scars from numerous cuts, premature arthritis, blood poisoning—and meager wages. Presiding over this most recent struggle are avatars from past ones: Cod is the androgynous Irish descendant of a woman who jumped to her death to avoid the flames in the terrible Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire that killed 146 workers behind locked doors over a century ago. In a deal with the devil, namely, the symbolic Sausage Man, emblematic of management, Cod survived but now must engage in every labor conflict from 1910 to the present. (Alas, it’s too nebulous, quixotic and precious a concept to really strike home.)

The specific workers in this latest showdown matter more. They slice up imaginary meat as their boss, Mr. Baquin, practices sexual harassment, improbably insisting on cleanliness despite the abattoir’s appalling conditions. The kill-floor is a seething pit of racial tension, class conflicts, and clandestine romance. All the time these exploited toilers must decide between the kind of solidarity that Cod embodies or the way of death suggested by the Sausage Man.

Kaiser Ahmed’s painstaking (and pains-giving) staging delivers memorable performances—Ryan Heindl’s doomed dyslexic kid, Kristin Anderson’s feisty rebel, Warren Feagins as a guilt-ridden supervisor, Anne Sears as an innocent fire victim, John Milewski as the twisted owner, AJ Ware as conflicted Cod, and Jack McCabe as the sinister Sausage Man. (I’d add Katherine Swan to the list but, lacking any projection, her mush-mouthed Maggot dropped too many lines to register on the stage.)

Discursive and fragmentary, Slaughter City hardly invites its audience to any feast of reason. Like Brecht, Wallace means to keep us at a distance. It’s not clear why: The choice between Cod and the Sausage Man is too obvious for this kind of detachment. Notwithstanding the play’s confusing concepts, Jackalope’s commanding dedication to a difficult story and subject deserves accolades, particularly during hard times where yesterday’s advocacy damnably doesn’t seem to work.

  
  
Rating: ★★★
  
  

Butchering the carcasses in "Slaughter City", produced by Jackalope Theatre.

Slaughter City, by Naomi Wallace, continues at Raven Theatre’s West Stage, 6157 N. Clark, through June 4th, with performances Thursdays-Saturdays at 8:30pm and Sundays at 3:30pm.  Tickets are $15, and can be purchased by phone (773-340-2553) or online here.  For more information, visit www.jackalopetheatre.org.

  
  
May 14, 2011 | 1 Comment More