Tag: Kenn E. Head

Review: Douglass (the american vicarious)

De'Lon Grant and Carrie Lee Patterson in Douglass, the american vicarious          
      
   
Douglass
 

Written by Thomas Klingenstein
at Theater Wit, 1229 W. Belmont (map)
thru Aug 14  |  tix: $25   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

July 26, 2016 | 0 Comments More

Top 10 Chicago Plays of 2015

 

Matthew Sherbach and Armand Fields star in Northlight Theatre's "Charm". John Mahoney and Audrey Francis star in Steppenwolf's "The Herd". Charli Williams, Anna Dauzvardis and Katrina D. Richards star in Raven Theatre's "Direct from Death Row: The Scottsboro Boys". Bernard White, Nisi Sturgis, Zakiya Young and J. Anthony Crane star in Goodman Theatre's "Disgraced." Becca Savoy, Michael McKeough and Sandy Elias star in Griffin Theatre's "Pocatello".Larry Yando and Eva Louise Balistreiri star in Chicago Shakespeare's "The Tempest" by William Shakespeare. Eunice Woods stars in American Theater Company's "The Project(s)" by PJ Paparelli and Joshua Jaeger. Mike Nussbaum stars in TimeLine Theatre's "The Price" by Arthur Miller.  Brian Parry and Jacqueline Grandt star in Redtwist Theatre's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" by Edward Albee. Brendan Connelly and McKenna Liesman star in Red Theater and Oracle Productions' "R + J: The Vineyard.

Another year, another 12 months of great Chicago theater! 2015 blessed Chicagoland with inspired new works and riveting revivals from a wide range of companies – the largest equity houses to the smallest of the city’s storefronts. Taking into account the 700+ productions that were produced in the Windy City over the last year, here are our reviewer’s picks for the best of the best. Bravo!!

See our picks below the fold

January 1, 2016 | 0 Comments More

Review: Sucker Punch (Victory Gardens Theater)

Maurice Demus stars as Leon in Victory Gardens Theater's "Sucker Punch" by Roy Williams, directed by Dexter Bullard. (photo credit: Michael Courier)      
      
Sucker Punch 

Written by Roy Williams
VG Biograph Theater, 2433 N. Lincoln (map)
thru Oct 18 |  tix: $15-$60 | more info
       
Check for half-price tickets    
    

September 28, 2015 | 0 Comments More

Review: Airline Highway (Steppenwolf Theatre)

Judith Roberts stars as Miss Ruby in the Steppenwolf Theatre's world premiere "Airline Highway" by Lisa D'Amour, directed by Joe Mantello. (photo credit: Michael Brosilow)        
      
Airline Highway

Written by Lisa D’Amour 
Directed by Joe Mantello
at Steppenwolf Theatre, 1650 N. Halsted (map)
thru Feb 14  |  tickets: $20-$86   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review 
     

January 19, 2015 | 0 Comments More

Review: Fish Men (Teatro Vista @ Goodman Theatre)

In a duel to the end, (left to right) Rey Reyes (Raúl Castillo) competes against chess hustler Cash (Cedric Mays) while John (Mike Cherry) and Dr. Lee (Gordon Chow) observe in Teatro Vista’s Fish Men, written by Cándido Tirado and presented by Goodman Theatre (April 7 – May 6).       
      
Fish Men 

Written by Candido Tirado  
Directed by Edward Torres
Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn (map)
thru May 6  |  tickets: $12-$42   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
             Read entire review
     

April 17, 2012 | 7 Comments More

Review: The Invisible Man (Court Theatre)

Teagle F. Bougere as the Invisible Man in the Oren Jacoby adaption of the Ralph Ellison novel, directed by Christopher McElroen and presented by Court Theatre (photo credit: Michael Brosilow).       
      
The Invisible Man 

Adapted by Oren Jacoby 
Based on novel by Ralph Ellison  
Directed by Christopher McElroen
at Court Theatre, 5535 S. Ellis (map)
thru Feb 19  |  tickets: $35-$65   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
           Read entire review
     

January 31, 2012 | 1 Comment More

Review: Spunk (Court Theatre)

     
lexis J. Rogers and Kenn E. Head - Spunk
Spunk
 

Adapted by George C. Wolfe
Based on the stories of Zora Neale Hurston
Music by Chic Street Man
Directed by Seret Scott
at Court Theatre, 5535 S. Ellis (map)
thru Oct 9  |  tickets: $40-$60  |  more info

Check for half-price tickets

   
     Read entire review

     
September 21, 2011 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: The Lost Boys of Sudan (Victory Gardens Theatre)

Rhyming verse, didactic storytelling hinder production

 (from left) Leslie Ann Sheppard, Samuel G. Roberson, Jr., Namir Smallwood, Kenn E. Head, Ann Joseph, Adeoye, Latricia Sealy and Nambi E. Kelley.  Photo Credit: Liz Lauren

 
Victory Gardens presents:
 
The Lost Boys of Sudan
 
Written by Lonnie Carter
Directed by
Jim Corti
at
Victory Gardens Biograph, 2433 Lincoln (map)
through April 25th (more info)

Reviewed by Oliver Sava

(from left) K-Gar Ollie (Leslie Ann Sheppard), A.I. Josh (Namir Smallwood) and T-Mac Sam (Samuel G. Roberson, Jr.) . Photo credit: Liz LaurenFrom the Sudanese desert to the frozen plains of Fargo, Lonnie Carter‘s The Lost Boys of Sudan is epic in scope. The story of three displaced Sudanese teenagers, the play uses the central plot of the boys’ search for a home as a stepping-stone to discussing such varied topics as religion, colonialism, and poaching – but Carter’s critiques often diminish the emotional intensity of the core relationship between the boys. The best parts of the play are when the boys are faced with the trials that come  from their circumstances: escaping crazed oil riggers, encountering twelve year old foot soldiers, boarding the plane to Fargo.  But the juxtaposition of this powerful storytelling versus generalized rants about the “Palinolithic age” only serve to derail the production.

The writing switches between prose and rhyming verse, and the shift is often jarring and unnecessary. Rhyming words become the ear’s focus and distract from the action of the play, and sometimes the rhymes feel like a stretch so that they can fit into the script (main offenders: "wet noodle" and "caboodle"; reciting "the itsy bitsy spider").

The efforts of director Jim Corti and his talented ensemble balance out the flaws of the writing, creating a final product that is technically impressive and incredibly polished. All of the actors have a great handle on the difficult African dialects, and as maligned as the verse may be, the entire ensemble approached the language with confidence. Narrator Ayoun (Nambi E. Kelley) does a great job connecting with the audience, delicately controlling the script’s wordplay and adding depth to the occasionally purple prose.

The boys, T-Mac Sam (Samuel G. Roberson, Jr.), K-Gar Ollie (Leslie Ann Sheppard), and A.I. Josh (Namir Smallwood), have great chemistry together, firmly established in those first moments where they must band together to brave the dangers of their hostile environment. The three actors do a great job of playing roles considerably younger than their actual ages, and as the characters mature you can hear the changes in their voices and see it in their bodies.

(front, w/gun) Adeoye plays a Sudanese guerrilla fighter, who confronts three Lost Boys (rear, from left) T-Mac Sam (Samuel G. Roberson, Jr.), K-Gar Ollie (Leslie Ann Sheppard), and A.I.Josh (Namir Smallwood) in Victory Gardens Theater's Chicago premiere of The Lost Boys of Sudan (photo: Liz Lauren) (from left) T-Mac Sam (Samuel G. Roberson, Jr.), A.I. Josh (Namir Smallwood), and K-Gar Ollie (Leslie Ann Sheppard) in Victory Gardens Theater's Chicago premiere of The Lost Boys of Sudan (photo credit: Liz Lauren)
Samuel G. Roberson, Jr. is one of three teens who makes an extraordinary passage from Sudan, to of all places, Fargo, North Dakota, in Lonnie Carter's "The Lost Boys of Sudan" (photo: Brett Neiman) lost-boys3

Sheppard gives a stand-out performance as K-Gar, the girl whose mother dresses her up as a boy to escape rebels razing their village, proving herself this season’s go-to girl for playing younger characters (The Hundred Dresses, The Snow Queen). K-Gar finds strength in her masculine disguise, one powerful scene has her taking up arms against men looking to enlist them as child soldiers, and this power stays with her even after she reveals herself and begins her life as a woman in America. After graduating high school, she refuses to stay in the sheltered United States, instead returning to Sudan so that she can counsel children like Twelve (Latricia Kamiko Sealy), a gun-toting preteen killer.

In Carter’s high concept script, Twelve is the concept that works the best. She appears at the start of the production to kill A.I. Josh’s father, later returning as a radio operator and finally a student at the camp where the lost boys are rescued. Twelve is the voice of all the children of Sudan, and Sealy plays the character with a ferocity that transforms into vulnerability as her immature mind copes with the terrors she committed. Twelve reveals the life the main characters would have if they had not escaped the various threats they encounter, and serves as a fantastic foil for the main characters, a lost girl that is never rescued.

 
Rating: ★★½
 

 

(front, from left) Nambi E. Kelley, Leslie Ann Sheppard, LaTricia Kamiko Sealy, and (rear, from left) Adeyoye, Samuel G. Roberson, Jr., Kenn E. Head and Ann Joseph (photo credit: Liz Lauren)

 

      
April 3, 2010 | 0 Comments More