Tag: Laura Rook

Review: Love’s Labor’s Lost (Chicago Shakespeare, 2017)

Jennie Greenberry and Jennifer Latimore star in Love's Labor's Lost, Chicago Shakespeare           
      
  

Love’s Labor’s Lost

Written by William Shakespeare 
Chicago Shakespeare Theater, Navy Pier (map)
thru March 26  |  tix: $48-$88  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

March 4, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: Othello (Chicago Shakespeare Theater, 2016)

James Vincent Meredith and Bethany Jillard in Othello, Chicago Shakespeare Theatre         
   

      
Othello

Written by William Shakespeare 
Chicago Shakespeare, Navy Pier (map)
thru Apr 10  |  tix: $48-$88  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
    

March 29, 2016 | 0 Comments More

Review: Henry V (Chicago Shakespeare Theater)

Harry Judge stars as Henry in Chicago Shakespeare's "Henry V" by William Shakespeare, directed by Christopher Luscombe. (photo credit: Liz Lauren)        
      
Henry V

Written by William Shakespeare 
Directed by Christopher Luscombe  
at Chicago Shakespeare on Navy Pier (map)
thru June 15  |  tickets: $48-$88   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review
     

June 2, 2014 | 0 Comments More

Review: The Liar (Writers’ Theatre)

Nate Burger and Laura Rook star in Writers' Theatre's "The Liar," adapted by David Ives from the comedy by Pierre Corneille, and directed by William Brown. (photo credit: Michael Brosilow)        
      
The Liar

Written by David Ives
Adapted from comedy by Pierre Corneille
Directed by William Brown 
Writers’ Theatre, 325 Tudor Ct., Glencoe (map)
thru Aug 11  |  tickets: $65-$70   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

July 11, 2013 | 0 Comments More

Review: Short Shakespeare! Romeo and Juliet (Chicago Shakespeare Theater)

Laura Rook as Juliet and Christopher Allen as Romeo, Chicago Shakespeare Theater        
      
Short Shakespeare!
        Romeo and Juliet
 

Written by William Shakespeare
Adapted and Directed by Rachel Rockwell  
at Chicago Shakespeare, Navy Pier (map)
thru March 23  |  tickets: $16-$20   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

February 24, 2013 | 2 Comments More

Review: Skylight (Court Theatre)

Laura Rook and Philip Earl Johnson star in Court Theatre's "Skylight" by David Hare, directed by William Brown.        
       
Skylight 

Written by David Hare
Directed by William Brown
at Court Theatre, 5535 S. Ellis (map)
thru Feb 10  |  tickets: $45-$65   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

January 30, 2013 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: Cash (XIII Pocket Ensemble)

        
        

Pissed off by Christmas frivolity? Then try ‘Cash’

        
        

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XIII Pocket Ensemble presents
  
Cash
  
Written by Stephen Louis Grush
Directed by
Jacob Lorenz
at
Stage 773, 1225 W. Belmont (map)
through Dec 19  |  tickets: $  |  more info

Reviewed by Katy Walsh

“Hello! I’m Johnny Cash.” XIII Pocket presents Cash with the tagline “The Man in Black, and the Death of the American Dream.” Music icon Johnny Cash sang soulful songs of the human condition. He became a legend singing about doing the wrong thing under the influence of drugs, lust and incarceration. All these themes twist into XIII Pocket’s introduction of folks struggling with being poor, bad, or obsessed. This Cash is less about Johnny and more about the lack of money. The monologue and dialogue vignettes are transitioned together by Johnny Cash songs. The JC selections are a more obscure sampling than his familiar mainstream blockbusters. So, it’s uncertain whether or not the songs mirror the IMGP5112stories. What is certain is that “playwright Stephen Louis Grush dulls the bandage-ripping drama with booze. On a stage decorated with dangling naked light bulbs, the misery and pain of every day Americans is illuminated from the shadows in Cash.

Under the direction by Jacob S. Lorenz, the cast is in intoxicated angst. In a three part vignette, Chip DavisWalks The Line” between crazy and drunk. He pontificates about snake dancing, eyeball donors and being someone’s bitch. Looking like a cross between Jesus and the band Alabama, Davis rants with an increasing dark intensity. Paige Smith and Mark Minton are a fury of “Hurt” as their drinking game spins horrifically out-of-control. Smith and Minton are uncomfortably real with spitting and gun pointing ferocity. Plagued by a “Ring of Fire”, Caitlin McGlone is poignant and funny as a woman screwing her cheating ex-husband. McGlone speaks directly to the audience with the familiar I-don’t–love-him-I-just-wish-I-didn’t-have-to-love-him logic of an unhealthy relationship. McGlone engages perfectly in her ordinariness. Laura Rook and Sean Driscoll have “It Ain’t Me, Babe” banter. The disdain is evident in a coupling crumble. Heath Cordts is primed for “Folsom Prison Blues”. Behind a pulpit, Cordts unemotionally describes a killing spree based around his favorite number ’13.’ Cordts is hysterical as a controlled disturbed freak. In fact, the entire cast is despicable in their portrayals of gritty folks not dealing in reality.

Getting Cash takes the right mindset. It’s not a show about Johnny Cash. It’s not a “Behind The Music” bio-pic on the celebrity. The songs referenced above are not heard during the performance. If you’re looking for a Man in Black to croon familiar tunes, Million Dollar Quartet is a better choice for you to get ‘Cashed’. But if you are tired of holiday plays; find yourself rooting for Scrooge and Grinch to the way they are, or nearly vomit every time you hear an obnoxious carol, this show is Cash-friendly for you! Perhaps, the only Anti-Christmas spirit option available, Cash sings speaks volumes.

   
   
Rating: ★★½
  
    

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Cash plays through December 19th, and can be seen Thursdays and Sundays at 8pm and Fridays and Saturdays at 10:30pm.  All performances at Stage 773 in Chicago. Running Time for Cash is 65-minutes with no intermission.

3-Words: The better half of a “Jackson” duet, Bill describes it with “disjointed, Cashless, negative.”

  
  
December 4, 2010 | 0 Comments More