Tag: Miranda Gonzalez

Review: Water & Power (UrbanTheater Company)

Ivan Vega and Dennis Garcia star as Power and Water in Water & Power, UrbanTheater Chicago           
      

  

Water & Power

Written by Richard Montoya  
Batey Urbano, 2620 W. Division (map)
thru July 22  |  tix: $20  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

June 28, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: La Gringa (UrbanTheater Company)

Sofia Tew and Nydia Castillo star in La Gringa by Carmen Rivera, UrbanTheater Chicago           
      
  

La Gringa

Written by Carmen Rivera
at UrbanTheater, 2620 W. Division (map)
thru Dec 11 Jan 28  |  tix: $20  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

January 17, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: Crime Scene, A Chicago Anthology (Collaboraction)

Scott Clifton Baity stars as Lil JoJo in Collaboraction's "Crime Scene: A Chicago Anthology", directed by Anthony Mosely. (photo credit: Cesario Moza)       
      
Crime Scene:
     A Chicago Anthology
 

Conceived and Directed by Anthony Mosely
Written by the Ensemble
at Collaboraction, 1579 N. Milwaukee (map)
thru April 7  |  tickets: $15-$30   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

March 24, 2013 | 1 Comment More

Review: Living Large in a Mini Kind of Way (Teatro Luna)

Living Large in a Mini Kind of Way - Teatro Luna, Diane Rodriguez       
      
Living Large in a 
    Mini Kind of Way
 

Written and Directed by Diane Rodriguez
at Viaduct Theatre, 3111 N. Western (map)
thru June 17  |  tickets: $12-40   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
            Read entire review
     

May 14, 2012 | 0 Comments More

Review: Crossed (Teatro Luna)

Teatro Luna Chicago - Crossed       
      
Crossed: How Going South 
              Flipped Our Script
 

Directed by Miranda Gonzalez
at The Viaduct Theatre, 3111 N. Western (map)
thru Dec 18  |  tickets: $15-$25   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

December 10, 2011 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: Lullaby (Teatro Luna)

 

A More Charming Than Frightful “Lullaby”

 

 

teatro luna lullaby poster

   
Teatro Luna presents
   
Lullaby
  
Written by Diane Herrera
Directed by Maria Enriquez & Miranda Gonzalez
at Greenhouse Theater Center, 2257 N. Lincoln (map)
through October 17  | 
tickets: $15-$25  |  more info

Reviewed by Paige Listerud

So much of Teatro Luna’s current production reflects their collectivist approach to creating Latina-driven theater. Their program lists the all-female cast without designating their roles in Diane Herrera’s new play, Lullaby. Both playwright and producer Alex Meda emphasize Teatro Luna’s collective development process. “Writing is a lonely profession,” says Herrera in the notes, “With the love and support of these talented women, I was not alone.” As a play, Lullaby itself contains a strong family feeling. While drawing in plot devices from thrillers, science fiction and fantasy, its collection of stories still center on traditional women’s roles as lovers, mothers, and daughters. Framing each told tale is a mother in a hospital room, telling story after story to her comatose daughter, hospitalized from some unnamed accident.

Lullaby by Teatro Luna at Greenhouse Theater Center Chicago It’s a difficult and multilayered conceit to hold together, but directors Maria Enriquez and Miranda Gonzalez tautly and delicately sustain Lullaby’s translucent dramatic arc. Behind each story, however bizarre or funny, lies a mother’s never ending love and concern, even a desperate feeling of never being able to do enough or be enough for the ones she loves. The tales are plentiful—a woman continually strives to save her suicidal sister; a high-maintenance diva shows up at couples counseling with the robot boyfriend she created; a real Little Mermaid gives up on the love she sacrificed her community and family for; an overworked, unappreciated office temp struggles to turn around her shallow fellow employees—and many more.

Every tale migrates into the realm of fantasy, humor almost always lightens each story’s theme of lost love, lost opportunities, lost children and, ultimately, lost lives. Make no mistake: these Latina ladies are very funny—again and again their comic timing alone takes one by surprise. Their seamless incorporation of drama, dance movement and acrobatics in the final story totally seals the deal on the mother’s lonely vigil with her unconscious daughter.

The cast’s dexterous ability to shift from tale to tale, within the framework of the mother waiting for her daughter to reawaken, is probably the production’s greatest achievement. Herrera’s tales shift uneasily—but hardly frighten or horrify. At first, the introduction of a traditional harlequin figure at the start of Lullaby seems artsy and pretentious, but each reappearance of the harlequin sets the scene on edge, with peril suggested by the uncertainty of its presence.

If there is any drawback to Lullaby, it’s that its darkness often doesn’t go dark enough. Herrera’s writing almost seems afraid to go there, afraid to go to the point where the child is truly lost, the opportunity for love and a future is lost, and there is no bringing it back, no laughing it off, no hoping that it might be different. Much as I appreciate the playwright’s desire to create an almost eternal state of suspension for the audience, maintaining that effect, even to the end of the play, reduces the mother in the hospital room to a thin symbolic figure; not a mother we can deeply connect with. This is a woman we want to know, even if she is like every other mother in her desperate attempts to make her daughter revive. Her child is gone and may never come back. The agony of her personal nightmare must become ours.

   
   
Rating: ★★★
   
   

teatro luna lullaby logo

October 9, 2010 | 0 Comments More

Review: GL 2010 – Not Your Generic Latina (Teatro Luna)

Teatro Luna – Anything but generic!

  photo by Johnny Knight

   
Teatro Luna presents
      
GL 2010 – Not Your Generic Latina
  
Developed & Directed by Miranda Gonzalez
at
Chicago Dramatists, 1105 W. Chicago (map)
through July 11  |  tickets: $15-$20  |  more info 

reviewed by Aggie Hewitt

Teatro Luna is a great theatre company. Billing themselves as "Chicago’s all Latina theatre company," Teatro Luna brings Latina actresses, writers and directors together to collaboratively compose all original material. Their new show, GL 2010, is styled as a review, made up of a series of vignettes, songs, and movement pieces. GL stands photo by Johnny Knight for Generic Latina, and shares a name with Teatro Luna’s first production. Although the material is all new, it is generated by the same idea as the original: what does the phrase "Generic Latina" mean?

As the audience enters, they are met with a particularly noticeable pre-show soundtrack, a hodgepodge of electronica music and samples from what sounds like a particularly dark telenovela. The walls of the set are absolutely covered with Spanish-language posters for movies, bands and night clubs; as well as a graffiti-style stencils of Mexican wrestling masks, ice cream trucks and Virgin Marys. The show starts with a bang, when a red jump suited audience member flies out of her seat and plows onto the stage to perform a high energy rap about her Latina experience, denying that there is anything generic about her at all. This opening number is representative of Teatro Luna at its very best: controlled, focused energy exploding with the joy of performance. After this first opening number, a gang of three mothers of adult children take the stage, a vignette that will be replicated twice during the show. The three women come from different Spanish speaking countries and discuss their cultural differences, and their shared worries about their children. Teatro Luna always takes its time to explore as many angles of Latina life as possible. The three mothers are vessels through which the culture is examined externally: the writer/performers themselves look at a part of their culture that they are much to young to experience and explore it like curious children, eager to show their findings.

GL 2010_010 GL 2010_006
GL 2010_008 GL 2010_005 GL 2010_001

GL 2010 is more reserved than the company’s previous shows. With a cast that welcomes a few new writer/performers, GL 2010 has the intellectual weight one expects from a Luna show, but comes off as emotionally guarded. Scenes are generated from autobiographical stories, which has given a raw, emotional edge to past shows like Lunaticas. It makes sense that GL 2010 would become more  intellectual than emotional: the premise of the show is to investigate what a Generic GL 2010_007Latina means, and to blow up that stereotype – and external struggle rather than an internal one.

There are some emotional highlights in GL 2010, however. Lauren Villegas‘ courtroom monologue is emotionally stirring and captivating, and the rap performances that act as a Greek Chorus in this show manage to both contain lots of thought-provoking information and have a warm emotional side. Teatro Luna is at its best during large, vibrant group scenes although some of the larger numbers in GL 2010 aren’t quite fully realized. An ode to the nightmarish act of female body waxing has the potential to be a major show stopper, but its viewpoint is too weak to be very ratable.

The women of Teatro Luna are a powerful force, and the work they put into their collaborative shows is evident in their product. GL 2010 isn’t a perfect show, but Teatro Luna is one of the coolest theater companies out there.

   
   
Rating: ★★½
 
 
June 15, 2010 | 0 Comments More