Tag: Rengin Altay

Review: King Liz (Windy City Playhouse)

Eric Gerard and Lanise Antoine Shelley star as Freddie and Liz in King Liz, Windy City           
      

   

King Liz

Written by Fernanda Coppel
Windy City Playhouse, 3014 W. Irving (map)
thru July 16  |  tix: $15-$55  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

June 20, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: life sucks. (Lookingglass Theatre)

Danielle Zuckerman and Penelope Walker as Sonia and Pickles in life sucks, Lookingglass           
      
   

life sucks.

Written by Aaron Posner
Lookingglass Theatre, 821 N. Michigan (map)
thru Nov 6  |  tix: $45-$65  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

September 21, 2016 | 0 Comments More

Review: Gypsy (Chicago Shakespeare)

Keith Kupferer, Jessica Rush and Louise Pitro star in Chicago Shakespeare's "Gypsy" by Jule Styen, Arthur Laurents and Stephen Sondheim; directed by Gary Griffin. (photo credit: Michael Brosilow)        
      
Gypsy

Jule Styne (music), Arthur Laurents (book)
   and Stephen Sondheim (lyrics)  
Directed by Gary Griffin  
Chicago Shakespeare at Navy Pier (map)
thru March 23  |  tickets: $48-$88   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
     
         
                   Read review
     

February 25, 2014 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: Float (About Face Theatre)

  
  

‘FLOAT’ rises to the top

  
  

float - About Face Theatre

   
About Face Theatre presents
   
FLOAT
   
Written by Patricia Kane
Directed by
Leslie B. Danzig
at Theater Wit, 1220 W. Belmont (map)
through December 12th  |  tickets: $15-$25  |  more info

Reviewed by Keith Ecker

In writing, archetypes are a gift and a burden. On one hand, they serve as shorthand characterization, eliminating the need for lengthy and clunky exposition. On the other hand, they are trite, predictable and rather one-dimensional. The trick as a writer is to toe this line. A good playwright will draft characters that rely on familiar characteristics while embodying personalities that are wholly original.

About Face’s world premier of Patricia Kane‘s FLOAT, a play about five Midwestern women forced to confront life’s big issues, could have become a cartoon. After all, it’s fun to mock small-town Midwestern mindsets and the cluckiness of female gossipmongers. And it’s also easy. Instead, Kane takes the high road and delivers a complex and compelling script that is edge-of-your-seat entertaining from beginning to end. Oh, don’t doubt that there’s a good dose of humor – but the laughs are underpinned by the many layers of conflict that bring these five women to life.

The play takes place in Doodee’s (Wendy Robie) barn. By her nature, she is a taskmaster and has taken it upon herself to spearhead the development of the women society’s annual Christmas float. Doodee is joined by her fellow society members, including the young Luce (Amy Matheny), real estate broker Char (Rengin Altay), the difficult Arletta (Peggy Roeder) and the new girl in town Marty (Adrienne Cury).

As the characters construct the holiday float in the first act, conversations turn to matters of religion and ethics. Old-timers Doodee and Arletta are stuck in their ways. In their opinion, there is a right and a wrong, and people deserve to be judged for their indiscretions. Luce, Marty and Char are more forgiving. In fact, Marty fondly quotes the Buddha, choosing to live by the code of live and let live.

By the end of the first act, the cheeriness that had filled the room earlier has faded as unpleasant secrets are revealed. Conflicts arise not just from exterior sources, but also from within as well. And Doodee is left decorating the float alone, listening to holiday songs while on the verge of tears. It’s a powerful act break that makes you resent intermission.

With Kane’s gift for writing and the cast’s gift for performance, this play is near perfection. Kane has molded three-dimensional characters with extraordinarily full lives and back stories. It is because of how thoroughly we know these characters that we can connect with them on such a deep level. In addition, I found no action or piece of dialogue to be out of character. Each woman was distinct and consistent in her nature.

Of course, these accolades can also be attributed to the actresses. Not one is a weak link. From Arletta’s manic episodes to Doodee’s brooding scowl to Marty’s love-struck smirk, the actresses’ genuineness, care and thought shine through. I can easily see the onstage chemistry congealing even more throughout the duration of the run.

Leslie B. Danzig‘s direction is nearly flawless. The whole play takes place in one cramped barn bustling with five scrambling women. Yet, through careful blocking, Danzig manages to give the actors some space, except of course when they are sharing an embrace under the mistletoe.

There was one small scene I’d like to see performed differently. In the second act, Marty conducts an exercise with the widowed Arletta to help her deal with her grief. The scene ends with an interesting revelation from Arletta, but the whole thing goes by too quickly. My recommendation is to slow this scene down, let it breath and it will feel more natural.

FLOAT is a wonderful holiday treat that pleases on a variety of levels. It’s funny, it’s sincere and it’s thought provoking. Plus, it’s got a dynamite cast. If you’re tired of all the holiday fluff that gets thrown on stage this time of year, check out FLOAT.

  
  
Rating: ★★★★
   
   
November 22, 2010 | 1 Comment More

About Face announces 2010-2011 Season, future plans

Artistic Director Bonnie Metzgar Announces 15th Season

 

about face logo

Including Three World Premieres, New Artistic Associates, and XYZ Festival

Celebrating the 15th anniversary of About Face Theatre, it looks like Artistic Director Bonnie Metzgar and new Executive Director Jason Held have upped the ante for the start of their next 15 years.  Included in the upcoming season is Float by Patricia Kane, Pony by Sally Oswald and The Homosexuals by Phillip Dawkins, are their second annual XYZ Festival of New Works

 

 

 

 

About Face is excited to roll out our 15th anniversary with a season that examines individuals at the precipice of change,” says Bonnie Metzgar. “As our organization and society at large both make pivotal choices, this season looks at the risks and exhilarating possibilities available to us in periods of transformation.

 

October 2010

XYZ Festival

The XYZ Festival will introduce Chicago audiences to the most innovative LGBTQA artists and artworks at all stages of development. Presented over the month of October, projects will include a workshop production of TINY ROOMS by Carson Kreitzer, and new works from AFT About Face Artistic Associates Tanya Saracho and Patrick Andrews, as well as a performance lounge series featuring AFT Artistic Associate Dan Stermer’s performance art/dance trio Double DJ, curated by AFT Marketing Director Jane Beachy. From the hundreds of scripts received for the XYZ Readings Series, four new plays by acclaimed emerging playwrights round out the festival.

XYZ Logo

November 11 – December 12

Float

FLOAT, a new play written by About Face Theatre (AFT) Artistic Associate Patricia Kane and directed by 500 Clown founder Leslie Danzig with dramaturgy by Jessica Thebus. The all-female cast includes Wendy Robie, Adrianne Cury, Peggy Roeder, Rengin Altay and AFT Artistic Associate Amy Matheny. FLOAT will run from November 11 – December 12 at Theater Wit (1229 West Belmont).

 

April-May 2011 

Pony

 

In April/May, About Face Theatre will present the world premiere of PONY by Sally Oswald, a play inspired by Georg Büchner, at the Chopin Theatre. Directed by Bonnie Metzgar, PONY will be featured as part of The Woyzeck Project, a city-wide festival hosted by About Face Theatre, The Hypocrites, and Collaboraction in which artists around the city will produce hybrid works inspired by the classic anti-war play. Set near the location of the famous murder scene in Woyzeck, PONY is a tale of shifting gender roles and the dangers of obsessive love.

 

June/July 2011

The Homosexuals

About Face Theatre will conclude its season in June/July with The Homosexuals by Chicago playwright Phillip Dawkins, starring Patrick Andrews at Victory Gardens Studio. The Homosexuals presents the interwoven lives, friendships, and relationships among six homosexual men over six years. Set at present time in a Midwestern city, Dawkins’ comedic and heartbreaking work examines the fears, doubts, and hope among the gay community in a 21st century perspective on the queer classic, The Boys in the Band.

About Face Theatre’s 15th Anniversary Season exemplifies how far the LGBTQ community has come from being defined by one issue to being seen as complex. In our 15 years, AFT has given voice to that changing dialogue around issues facing the queer community. As we move forward, we understand the need to bring the conversation around sexuality and gender to all people,” says Executive Director Jason Held.

 

 

 

August 11, 2010 | 0 Comments More