Tag: Richard Jarvie

Review: Love’s Labor’s Lost (Chicago Shakespeare, 2017)

Jennie Greenberry and Jennifer Latimore star in Love's Labor's Lost, Chicago Shakespeare           
      
  

Love’s Labor’s Lost

Written by William Shakespeare 
Chicago Shakespeare Theater, Navy Pier (map)
thru March 26  |  tix: $48-$88  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

March 4, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: The Book of Joseph (Chicago Shakespeare Theater)

Francis Guinan and Sean Fortunato star as Richard Hollander and Joseph in The Book of Joseph, Chicago Shakes           
      
  

The Book of Joseph

Written by Karen Hartman 
Chicago Shakespeare, Navy Pier (map)
thru March 5  |  tix: $48-$58  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets
     

February 26, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: King Charles III (Chicago Shakespeare Theater)

Robert Bathurst, King Charles III, Chicago Shakespeare Theater           
      
  

King Charles III

Written by Mike Bartlett
Chicago Shakespeare at Navy Pier (map)
thru Jan 15  |  tix: $48-$88  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

November 18, 2016 | 0 Comments More

Review: October Sky (Marriott Theatre)

Susan Moniz and Nate Lewellyn star in Marriott Theatre's "October Sky" by Michael Mahler and Aaron Thielen, directed by Rachel Rockwell. (photo credit: Liz Lauren)       
      
October Sky 

Music/Lyrics by Michael Mahler
Book by Aaron Thielen
Marriott Theatre, Lincolnshire (map)
thru Oct 11 | tix: $50-$55 | more info
       
Check for half-price tickets    
    

August 31, 2015 | 0 Comments More

Review: Broadway Bound (Drury Lane Oakbrook)

  
  

Cue the laughs

  
  

Max Polski, Mike Nussbaum, Carmen Roman, Jason Karasev, Paula Scrofano and Richard McWilliams in Drury Lane Oakbrook's "Broadway Bound" by Neil Simon.

   
Drury Lane Oakbrook presents
   
   
Broadway Bound
   
Written by Neil Simon
Directed by David New
at Drury Lane Oakbrook, Oakbrook (map)
through July 31  |  tickets: $35-$46  |  more info

Reviewed by Lawrence Bommer

There’s a telling scene near the end of Broadway Bound where young Eugene Jerome, the fictitious, future Neil Simon, raptly listens to his mother. First shyly, then rhapsodically, she retells a familiar recollection: how one special night George Raft, slick, sophisticated and notorious, actually asked her to dance, how they eased across a spellbound dance floor and how young Kate became, too briefly, the envy of the neighborhood.

Jason Karasev and Max Polski in Drury Lane's "Broadway Bound" by Neil Simon.Simon not only shapes the memory like a living statue, he shows us Eugene’s amazement that his mother ever had a vibrant life apart from him. More importantly, Eugene is caught in the act of becoming a writer: This time around he doesn’t just hear Kate’s oft-told tale, he transforms it into an imaginary play by acting out audience reactions and punching home the reverie’s big moments.

All the give and take between life and art is right there in this seminal scene.

Capping Brighton Beach Memoirs and Biloxi Blues, Broadway Bound, the third installment in Simon’s semi-autobiographical trilogy, is in many ways the most revealing. Simon’s "Portrait of the Artist as A Young Gag Writer" depicts a young, contagiously hopeful Eugene and his eager-beaver brother Stanley embarking on a career as comedy writers at the very moment their Brooklyn-bound family is falling apart: Their grandparents have separated, their parents are soon to split, and at the end Eugene and Stanley – no longer stockroom and retail clerks, but salaried serial writers for CBS Radio – leave home for Manhattan. (Again Eugene acts as narrator; it makes good sense, given the writer’s journey depicted by Biloxi Blues.)

It’s almost comically cruel, this Chekhov-like juxtaposition of the sons’ callow careerism with the rapid disintegration of the Jerome household. It should be sad but there’s too much life to it.

Equally honest is the way this domestic drama refuses to fob off neat solutions, let alone a happy ending. The story builds by relentlessly denying any expectations of any joyous, last-minute reconciliation. At the same time the most positive force in the play, Eugene’s ambition to strike it rich as a radio writer, is nothing more than a dramatic promissory note.  It’s a harrowing picture of a past that’s rapidly burning out and a future that stays beyond reach.  Fortunately, the comparatively little of the play that happens in the present tense is delightful, by no means the usual formulaic "simple Simon."

It’s the late 40s and, whether he knows it or not, young Eugene, a hardened veteran of family squabbles (Brighton Beach Memoirs) and World War II (Biloxi Blues), is slowly turning his life into art. With their mother’s blessing, Eugene and Stanley want to be comic writers; the father just wants them to work hard, as he must in a job he loathes, and not complain. Rich with a writer’s details gleaned from sharp-eyed observation, these family portraits resonate with the charm of memory and the harshness of the actual. The now-rich Aunt Blanche returns, desperate to reunite her parents. But Eugene’s Trotsky-loving grandfather refuses to join his wife in Florida, certain no decent socialist could ever submit to such self-indulgence.

At the same time Eugene’s mother Kate is helpless to keep her brood from slipping away or even to get them to show up for dinner (a telling difference from Brighton Beach Memoirs).

Instead, Kate watches her marriage take the same downward course as her mother’s. Husband Jack, burnt out from years of dead-end work as a cutter of women’s raincoats, is unfaithful and, no Jezebel, the other woman is a middle-aged, dying widow who simply asks Jack questions that make him see everything differently. So Kate is left to agonize over a lifetime’s sacrifices, including one of a life of her own; well, they seemed so important at the time…

If Kate looks back, Eugene and Stanley are trying to peel the wrappings from their future. In the play’s most original scene we see Eugene and Stanley working against a looming deadline as they desperately search for a surefire formula for flawless comedy. (An exhausted Stanley remarks, "I love being a writer–it’s just the writing I can’t take.") At last Stanley finds it: people laugh when a character’s overwhelming need for something is frustrated by some undeniable conflict. Their example–a man with a busted back and a woman with a broken leg that can’t close a window in winter– isn’t screamingly funny, but it contains that crucial element, other people’s pain, that Simon will exploit in many, many comedies to come.

     
Paula Scrofano and Mike Nussbaum Carmen Roman, Max Poski, and Mike Nussmaum
Carmen Roman and Richard McWilliams Paul Scrofano Max Polski

Certainly the play practices what it preaches: Hilarious conflict between art and life and between life and life erupts when the family gather to hear the brothers’ first half-hour broadcast. It doesn’t help that the grandfather despises humor: art should be ”about something,” he argues, preferably the coming victory of the proletariat. Disagreeing, the Jerome brothers know that writers must write about what they know, in this case their family.

But when the Jeromes see themselves as the butt of national jokes, especially when the radio dad is described as a garment cutter who’s "into lady’s pajamas," it’s no laugh a minute. Interpreting the crack as an accusation of adultery, Jack reviles the boys for disgracing the family by hanging out their dirty laundry. Stanley retorts that their father dirtied it himself. Of course both are right, which is just what makes it hurt.

The moment represents Eugene’s first encounter with the treacherous power of art over life. But he soon learns that other family friends who listened to the broadcast thought the boys were spoofing ”their families.” So art can transcend its inspiration after all. The play ends in a series of Chekhovian farewells.

Setting aside the art vs. life dialectic, Broadway Bound is just a play that wants to please. Drury Lane Oakbrook’s production certainly does, thanks to the uncondescending compassion with which director David New colors Simon’s broken home. Collette Pollard‘s cut-away two-story stage is a nostalgically appointed, grown-up doll’s house while Linda Roethke‘s period costumes eloquently tell their time.

Mike Nussbaum Gangly Max Polski nicely balances Eugene’s coltish energy and hunger for the big time against his helplessness to prevent his parents’ breakup. At first defensively glib and perky as beleaguered Kate, Carmen Roman eventually–and dramatically–hardens herself. Despite a nearly perpetual frown, this mother faces her hard times with unforced grace and no small residue of love, and when she recalls the close encounter with George Raft the whole stage glows.

From the start Richard McWilliams emotionally isolates the bitter, lonely father ("There’s no place for me"); where almost everyone else reaches out he’s resolutely pulling in. In contrast, Jason Karasev as needy Stanley shows us all too well the price he’s paid for the father who isn’t there for him. In a sharply etched cameo, Paula Scrofano conveys aunt Blanche’s current crisis: She won’t feel guilty because she’s rich.

The most cunning work is Chicago legend Mike Nussbaum‘s foxy performance as the sardonic, all too literal, grandfather, a man who can tell a joke without getting it. No doubt this boiler-plated curmudgeon is the hardest audience Eugene ever played to–and the best discipline possible for a future king of Broadway.

The play’s one problem remains constant since 1986: Too often Simon answers questions we never asked and dodges ones that we do: Just what do the boys learn about the danger of life imitating life from their embarrassing exposure of their family on national radio? Why do they turn to comedy as a distraction from the family crises? (Why not woodworking?) Why do they need to make us laugh? There’d be some great answers there. Just asking.

  
  
Rating: ★★★
  
  

Max Polski, Mike Nussbaum, Carmen Roman, Jason Karasev and Richard McWilliams

    All photos by Brett Beiner


June 18, 2011 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: The Mikado (Lyric Opera of Chicago)

     
     

Lyric creates a perfect holiday gift

     
     

01 Neal Davies as Ko-Ko center with Lyric Opera Chorus THE MIKADO DAN_4344 c Dan Rest

   
Lyric Opera of Chicago presents
   
The Mikado
   
Written by W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan
Directed by Gary Griffin
Civic Opera House, 20 N. Wacker (map)
through Jan 21  |  tickets: $48-$217   |  more info 

Reviewed by Paige Listerud

I’ve found it, the perfect Christmas gift! It is Lyric Opera Chicago’s radiant, lush, sophisticated and gorgeous production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Mikado. One could even put a big red bow on it, the same color as the massive, velvety red flats that act as imperial Japanese doors to the proscenium of Lyric’s stage. They are perfect—as is the whole of Mark Thompson’s design for the production. How else to describe his set and costumes’ color palate but as a visual seduction that amplifies and fulfills Arthur Sullivan’s opulent score. Christine Binder’s lighting molds pure magic from Thompson’s rich golds, pinks, purples, reds, and sky blues, chartreuse 15 James Morris as THE MIKADO RST_9172 c Dan Restand wood tones. Updating the operetta to early 1920s Japan is also an inspired change that refreshes and illuminates good old G&S for today’s audience.

Conducted by Sir Andrew Davis and stage-directed by Gary Griffin, Lyric creates the kind of sumptuous dream that brings forth incredibly powerful musical moments, offset with sprightly comedy that makes the whole enterprise deceptively light and airy. That Davis and Chorus Master Donald Nally would draw gorgeous performances from their superlative cast may already seem a fete accompli to Lyric audiences; but that Griffin tops off the whole luxurious feast with the cherry and whipped cream perfection of precisely timed comedy is the real celebration of the evening. Clearly the cast is having too much fun and their enjoyment of W. S. Gilbert’s material is infectious.

Should this whole opera thing not work out, Neal Davies has a future in comedy. His Ko-Ko, a common tailor unexpectedly raised from near-execution (for the grave offense of flirting) to an appointment as Titipu’s Lord High Executioner, captures the wry mischievousness and cheerful nervousness of the arriviste who never expected to arrive. Of course, it helps to have one fabulously tacky hairpiece (wigs by Richard Jarvie) to clearly signal hopeful insecurity. Ko-Ko temporarily thwarts the romantic chance of the charmingly jejune Nanki-Poo (Toby Spence), who has journeyed to the village of Titipu to woo Yum-Yum (Andriana Chuchman), Ko-Ko’s ward and prospective bride-to-be.

      
07 Katharine Goeldner Andriana Chuchman Andrew Shore Emily Fons THE MIKADO RST_8395 c Dan Rest 10 Stephanie Blythe as Katisha THE MIKADO DBR_4064 c Dan Rest
06 Neal Davies as Ko-Ko THE MIKADO RST_8169 c Dan Rest 12 Toby Spence as Nanki-Poo Andriana Chuchman as Yum-Yum Neal Davies as Ko-Ko THE MIKADO RST_9010 c Dan Rest
   

In fact, in true G&S style, charmingly jejune is how one could describe the young leads of the show. It’s sounds cliché but, then, G&S revels in clichés–Spence and Chuchman make a darling, lyrical couple that clearly hasn’t got a gray cell to share between them. One relishes the heartfelt silliness of their romance, while becoming unfailingly reinvigorated at the prospect of romance succeeding—even though one can hardly say that it is ever really threatened. Meanwhile Ko-Ko, Pooh-Bah (Andrew Shore) and Pish-Tush (Philip Kraus) regale the audience with the absurdities of their respective posts as Titipu’s administration. Shore doesn’t miss a hilarious beat pointing up Pooh-Bah’s ridiculous attachment to his pedigree or his decidedly mercenary approach to civil service. Together they crisply whip off “I am so proud,” wherein Ko-Ko realizes that, under the orders of the Mikado (James Morris), he must find someone in Titipu to execute within a month or it could be his head, once again, on the “big black block.”

Happily, Nanki-Poo arrives to do himself in and Ko-Ko persuades him not to squander his death in wasteful suicide—rather, do your patriotic duty and let the state kill you instead. He promises a month of married happiness with Yum-Yum in return for Nanki-Poo’s timely and well-celebrated execution. Just when it seems as though our young lovers have a chance at some limited happiness, Katisha (Stephanie Blythe) arrives in full force, seeking Nanki-Poo, who is actually the son of the Mikado and her betrothed.

Let me say that Lyric brought the big guns when they picked Blythe for this role. Her mezzo-soprano dominates the stage and one couldn’t ask for a more humorous or more resplendently-voiced ruthless virago. Tell us, how does it feel to have all that power, Ms. Blythe? Because Griffin’s staging allows her glorious full play, whether she is reaching operatic heights with the chorus with “Oh fool that fleest my hallowed joys!” and “For he’s going to marry Yum-Yum” or outshining the arrival of the Mikado in “Miya Sama.”

All that can be said of James Morris’s turn as the Mikado is that it’s too bad he doesn’t have more numbers. “A More Humane Mikado” is always an anticipated delight and Morris acquits himself with privileged dignity, polish and grace, while amusingly forbearing Katisha’s constant upstaging. The Mikado’s arrival precipitates the need for an execution and Ko-Ko decides to let Yum-Yum and Nanki-Poo marry while faking Nanki-Poo’s execution on the death certificate. When Katisha discovers Nanki-Poo’s name on the certificate, his true identity as the Mikado’s son is revealed to all and Ko-Ko once again finds he is headed for the big, black block unless he can seduce Katisha into forgetting all about Nanki-Poo and marry him.

16 Neal Davies as Ko-Ko Stephanie Blythe as Katisha THE MIKADO RST_9339 c Dan RestThis is not to say that Davies’ excellent rendering of the classic “Tit-Willow” depends upon a tree, but Thompson’s set design brings home the song’s comic impact by balancing it against Yum-Yum’s enchanting declaration of self-love and Katisha’s misery at losing her chance at marital bliss. Under the radiant pinks of a tree festooned with cherry blossoms, Chuchman effortlessly delivers “The Sun Whose Rays;” the same tree is theatrically brought into the scene with twisted and barren branches against a backdrop of mournful indigos and purples when Katisha sings “Alone, and Yet Alive!” Then the same barren tree remains under which Ko-Ko stands to sing a made-up account, of a birdie committing suicide over blighted love, to seduce Katisha.

It’s a moment that simply and elegantly unites all three as it gently and reassuringly spoofs the heart in its outlandishly unreasonable passionate expectations.

It is a bit of silliness that is pure genius and that is what Lyric’s Mikado pulls off so well throughout the whole production. The show will send you into the cold winter night, your ear alight with its happy tunes and a joyful heart against the cares of this world. And what could be a better Christmas gift than that?

  
  
Rating: ★★★★
   
   

17 Andriana Chuchman Toby Spence Neal Davies, James Morris Stephanie Blythe THE MIKADO RST_9395 c Dan Rest

Running Time: 2 hours, 54 minutes. In English with projected English texts

 

 

     
     
December 11, 2010 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: Marriage of Figaro (Lyric Opera)

This marriage is a flawless, fun farce

 figaro14

Lyric Opera of Chicago presents:

Marriage of Figaro

Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conducted by
Sir Andrew Davis
Stage directed by
Herbert Kellner
Projected English supertitles by Francis Rizzo
at
Civic Opera House through March 27th (more info)

By Katy Walsh

figaro01Figaro wants to marry Susanna. Marcellina wants to marry Figaro. Bartolo wants to marry the Countess. The Count wants Susanna. The Countess wants the Count. Cherubino wants everybody.  Arias of lust love are in the air!

Lyric Opera of Chicago presents Marriage of Figaro, composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. A four act opera buffa (comedy) performed in Italian with projected English translations. A sequel to The Barber of Seville, the opera is set in the late eighteenth century. Figaro and Susanna want to marry. As servants of the Count, the union must be authorized by him. In addition, the Count may choose to invoke the custom of ‘having the bride’ before giving her away. The Count is not the only one interfering with Figaro’s marriage. Debts and betrayals have followed him from his The Barber of Seville days. Through a comedic series of tricks and twists, love eventually conquers all.

Throughout all four acts, this cast sings and plays well together. It’s like watching a group of friends setting up good natured pranks to teach each other a lesson. Leading the playful spirit, Danielle De Niese (Susanna) is an adorable, lively sprite with pitch-perfect, comedic timing. Kyle Ketelsen (Figaro) delivers a solid bass-baritone performance as the ultimate cocky player. Anne Schwanewilms (Countess) laments the loss of her husband’s affections in a gorgeous rendition of “Porgi Amor”, and later vows to regain his love in “Dove Sono”. Within the frivolity of the frenzy of multiple charades, her arias are the quiet moments of true clarity and sadness of love lost. The Countess describes her husband as ‘modern: faithless, willful, not so much jealous, as vain.’ Mariusz Kwiecien (Count) embodies that description while – being the brunt of the shams – struggling at the same time. Kwiecien delivers his own spectacular aria “Vedro, mentr’io sospiro” with promises of vengeance to the pranksters. Joyce DiDonato (Cherubino) is a woman playing a boy sometimes playing a woman. She’s hilarious with her portrayal of a youth; a slave to his strong lustful infatuations. In a smaller role, Andrea Silvestrelli (Bartolo) makes his presence memorable with his booming bass singing. His aria “La vendetta” is magnificent. In particular, in one sequence, Silvestrelli squeezes his huge, rich voice through a series of rapid notes. Amazing.

figaro02 figaro11
figaro12 figaro10 figaro09

The Lyric Opera of Chicago has chosen to close its 2009-2010 season with a warhorse. Even to new opera goers, this Mozart’s masterpiece has familiar pieces. The overture and a few of the arias are used in movie scores to enhance themes of multiple plots colliding or love loss. The Lyric has cast it perfect and – under the guidance of Sir Andrew Davis at the baton – Marriage of Figaro hits all the right notes for high spirited high-jinx.  Highly recommended!

From the first note of the overture to the standing ovation, Marriage of Figaro is a flawless, fun farce!

Rating: ★★★★

 

Running Time: Three hours and forty-five minutes includes a thirty minute intermission

Note: Libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on Pierre-Augustin Beaumarchais’ play La folle journee, ou Le marriage de Figaro (1784).

View (2010-02) Marriage of Figaro - Lyric Opera
March 3, 2010 | 2 Comments More

REVIEW: Elixir of Love (Lyric Opera)

The elixir works, audience swoons!

 elixir-title

All photos by Dan Rest

Lyric Opera presents

The Elixir of Love

 

By Gaetano Donizetti
Libretto by
Felice Romani
Conducted by
Bruno Campanella
Stage directed by
Giulio Chazalettes
Thru February 22nd  (more info)

By Katy Walsh

09. Gabriele Viviani, Nicole Cabell. The Elixir of Love. DBR_4986 c. Dan RestWe’ve seen it before – a guy in love (lust?) uses alcohol to overcome his shyness and catch the girl. Lyric Opera presents their own version of this scenario in The Elixir of Love by Gaetano Donizetti. Nemorino is in love with Adina. Adina is playing the field by flirting with a touring soldier, Belcore. To win Adina’s heart, Nemorino buys an elixir from a traveling peddler, Dulcamara. The potion is actually of bottle of Bordeaux. Eager to make a little cash, Dulcamara proclaims the miracle tonic clears up the complexion, cures joint pain and makes people fall in love. Due to a series of circumstances, all the village women try to court Nemorino. Both Adina and Dulcamara are stunned to observe Nemorino’s popularity. And all ends up well in the end.

Sung in Italian with English subtitles, The Elixir of Love has the signature opera element of multiple characters singing different words simultaneously for a rich sound. Unlike many operas, this show is a light hearted romantic comedy.

To be a principal in an opera, the prerequisite is a fantastic singing voice; an ability to act is not a deal breaker. Making his Lyric Opera debut, Giuseppe Fillanoti (Nemorino) is the full entertainment package. He can sing. He can act. And he’s nice to look at. Fillanoti plays the romantic lead with innocent simplicity and comedic timing. In the show’s most familiar aria “Una furtiva lagrima” (“One furtive tear”), Fillanoti is flawless in his soulful celebration. Holding her own, Nicole Cabell (Adina) is a playful match for Fillanoti. She sings through a range of personas: light-hearted flirt to strategic game player to nervous competitor to woman in love. Although Fillanoti and Cabell are cast perfectly together, their harmonious coupling will end with their February 5th performance. Frank Lopardo (Nemorino) and Susanna Phillips (Adina) will take over the roles from February 7th thru 22nd. The rest of the cast will be featured for the entirety of the run including the wonderful performances of a cocky Belcore (Gabriele Viviani), smooth-singing salesman Dulcamara (Alessandro Corbelli), and village women leader Giannetta (Angela Mannino).

06. Act 1, The Elixir of Love. RST_2054 c. Dan Rest 11. Alessandro Corbelli, Nicole Cabell. The Elixir of Love. DBR_5233 c. Dan Rest
04. Nicole Cabell, Giuseppe Filianoti. The Elixir of Love. DBR_4630 c. Dan Rest 07. Giuseppe Filianoti, Alessandro Corbelli. The Elixir of Love. DBR_4818 c. Dan Rest

Though the cast shines, the creative design is lackluster. The costumes and set of The Elixir of Love are stagnant. Having anticipated the theatrical spectacle as is the Lyric Opera style, it’s a little disappointing. But as a consolation, LO does bring out a live horse on stage pulling the peddler’s wagon, though – because of the massive stage – the horse blends in with the 50+ villagers chorus. (I can’t help but question how Lyric gets a horse inside the Civic Opera House and where does it stand between scenes. As classy as the Lyric is, I like to imagine that the horse has his own dressing room equipped with the best carrots and saddle soap.)

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, The Elixir of Love is the perfect date opera. It’s a romantic comedy that has a happy ending. This is not always the case in real life or on the opera stage, so enjoy it while you can.

 

Rating: ★★★½

 

03. Nicole Cabell, Giuseppe Filianoti. The Elixir of Love. DBR_4609 c. Dan Rest 15. Alessandro Corbelli. The Elixir of Love. RST_1172 c. Dan Rest 13. Giuseppe Filianoti. The Elixir of Love. RST_1022 c. Dan Rest
January 24, 2010 | 1 Comment More