Tag: Scott Pask

Review: Something Rotten! (Broadway in Chicago)

Something Rotten  cast at Broadway in Chicago (JD)            
        

  

Something Rotten! 
 
By Karey Kirkpatrick, Wayne Kirkpatrick
   and John O’Farrel
at Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph (map)
thru July 23  |  tix: $27-$98  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

July 15, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: Finding Neverland (Broadway in Chicago)

Finding Neverland cast, Broadway Chicago (photo Carol Rosegg)           
         

Finding Neverland

By James Graham (book), and
 Gary Barlow, Eliot Kennedy (music, lyrics) 
Cadillac Palace Theatre, 151 W. Randolph (map)
thru Dec 4  |  tix: $34-$115  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

November 29, 2016 | 0 Comments More

Review: Airline Highway (Steppenwolf Theatre)

Judith Roberts stars as Miss Ruby in the Steppenwolf Theatre's world premiere "Airline Highway" by Lisa D'Amour, directed by Joe Mantello. (photo credit: Michael Brosilow)        
      
Airline Highway

Written by Lisa D’Amour 
Directed by Joe Mantello
at Steppenwolf Theatre, 1650 N. Halsted (map)
thru Feb 14  |  tickets: $20-$86   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review 
     

January 19, 2015 | 0 Comments More

Review: The Barber of Seville (Lyric Opera of Chicago)

Alessandro Corbelli and Nathan Gunn star in Lyric Opera's "The Barber of Seville" by Gioachino Rossini, directed by Rob Ashford. (photo credit: Dan Rest)        
      
The Barber of Seville

Music by Gioachino Rossini  
Libretto by Cesare Sterbini
Directed by Rob Ashford
at Civic Opera House, 20 N. Wacker (map)
thru Feb 28  |  tickets: $20-$229   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review
     

February 13, 2014 | 1 Comment More

Review: The Book of Mormon (Broadway in Chicago)

Nic Rouleau as Elder Price in Broadway in Chicago's "Book of Mormon" by Trey Parker, Matt Stone and Robert Lopez. (photo credit: Joan Marcus)        
       
The Book of Mormon 

Book, Music and Lyrics Trey Parker,
    Matt Stone and Robert Lopez
Directed by Casey Nicholaw and Trey Parker
Bank of America Theatre, 18 W. Monroe (map)
thru June 2  |  tickets: $45-$115   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

December 20, 2012 | 1 Comment More

Review: Hair (Broadway in Chicago – Oriental Theatre)

     
     

Competent ‘Hair’ revels in its own kitsch

       
     

The company from national tour of 'Hair', now playing at The Oriental Theatre.  Photo credit: Joan Marcus

  
Broadway in Chicago presents
  
Hair
  
Book/Lyrics by Gerome Ragni & James Rado
Music by
Galt MacDermot
Directed by
Diane Paulus
at the
Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph (map)
through March 20  |  tickets: $27-$90  |  more info 

Reviewed by Dan Jakes

If the pre-show announcement–which asks that you please turn on your heart and to please turn off your cell phone–isn’t a clear indication, there’s plenty of proverbial winking in director Diane PaulusHair. From the restrained band volume to the affable, mostly miles-from-the-danger-line interactions between actors and audience, we’re assured from the beginning that the night’s show is going to be professional, going to be groovy, and going to be safe.

Safety, of course, was not what made Gerome Ragni and James Rado’s rock-musical about a tribe of hippies significant. It defied modern standards of decency, blazed new theatrical territory and was written and performed in the chaotic epicenter of the same cultural revolution it advocated.

Today, young, accomplished, svelte actors teeter on some house seats, take a few trips down the aisles, dry hump for effect, and stand naked for the requisite nude The company from national tour of 'Hair', now playing at The Oriental Theatre.  Photo credit: Joan Marcusscene.

But let’s face it. Entertainment value aside, The Man acquisitioned Hair a long time ago. It’s unclear when, but the changeover presumably took place some time after religious groups stopped picketing outside of performances and some time before it began running in theaters named after multi-billion dollar car companies.

During this revival, I thought about what, if any, our contemporary equivalent to the monument Hair was in its heyday for intrepidity and relevance. It’s certainly nothing that can be described in the same genre (in the grand scheme of art and provocation, rock-musicals are now, by more honest billing, lite-rock-musicals). I won’t pretend to romanticize living in the late 1960’s–one, I would not yet exist as a fetus for another two decades and two, it was a notoriously violent era of persecution, uncertainty, hate, and abused authority–but I can appreciate the time’s profound art and its ability to have instigated change.

Yet the national conflicts Ragni and Rado wrote about are still (in some cases, eerily) recognizable. Our current generation is witness to an aggressively protested war, sex as a talking point for political candidates, old white men tossing around the word “communist” to rebuke lefties, and mainstream efforts to legalize marijuana. Then is it fair to wonder if, for all its critical acclaim, this latest resurgence of Hair missed an opportunity to be more than a technically laudable send-up to a counter-cultural artifact?

Lawrence Stallings, Steel Burkhardt and Matt DeAngelis in the 'Hair' National Tour. Photo: Joan MarcusIt’s telling that during opening night’s post-curtain-call “Be-In,” where the tribe welcomes the audience onstage to dance through a reprise, the cast really had to coax people to budge. Some inevitably jumped up, but most smiled good-naturedly while inconspicuously grabbing their coats and eying the exits.

Some rapport never got established.

And some did. As Berger, Steel Burkhardt has the most opportunity to break down the fourth-wall and create a sense of community. He doesn’t as often as I‘d have liked, but his allocated moments for addressing the audience are the most entertaining, substantive parts of the show. Taking a gentle stab at an over-zealous laugher is funny–allowing another to stuff single dollar bills down his suede fringe loincloth is funny and opens up the risk and fun of watching anything-goes action. The rest of Hair could benefit from this sense of happening and authenticity.

Vocally, the ensemble is consistent, and fits well within the folk-rock style Galt MacDermot’s compositions call for. Appropriately cast, these kids look and sound like the embodiment of young idealism and acceptance. At times, they’re sublime.

Billing a show as a revival carries a certain weight, implication and spirit. I’m not confident this latest production lives up to these. But as a fully-produced tribute, it’s at least a good trip.

  
  
Rating: ★★★
   
  

Center: Paris Remillard as Claude and Steel Burkhardt as Berger, in a scene from the national tour of 'Hair'. Photo credit: Joan Marcus

Steel Burkhardt, Hair the Musical, Joan Marcus Paris Remillard, Matt DeAngelis, Hair the Musical, Joan Marcus

Hair continues through March 20th, with performances Tuesday at 7:30, Wednesday 2 and 7:30pm, Thursday 7:30pm, Friday 8pm, Saturday 2 and 8pm, and Sunday 2pm.  Tickets are $27 and $90, and can be bought at www.broadwayinchicago.com.

     
     
March 11, 2011 | 1 Comment More