Tag: Shea Coffman

Review: The Bridges of Madison County (Marriott Theatre)

Kathty Voytko and Nathaniel Stampley star as Francesca and Robert in Bridges of Madison County            
         

The Bridges of Madison County

By Jason Robert Brown (music & lyrics)
   and Marsha Norman (book)
Marriott Theatre, Lincolnshire, IL (map)
thru Aug 13  |  tix: $50-$60  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets    
     

July 5, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (Emerald City Theatre)

Mark Kosten, Tommy Bullington, Alex Heika, Maddy LaRoche, Patricia Lavery, Michael Rashid, RJ Silva and Jonathan Shroelucke in Emerald City Theatre's "Alexander and the ...Very Bad Day", directed by Ernie Nolan. (photo credit: Tom McGrath)       
     
Alexander and the Terrible, 
Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Written by Judith Viorst and Shelly Markham
Directed by Ernie Nolan
at the Apollo Theater, 2540 N. Lincoln (map)
thru June 17  |  tickets: $13-$16   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets  
         
        Read entire review 

February 23, 2012 | 0 Comments More

Review: If You Give a Cat a Cupcake (Emerald City)

     
Kyle Rehder as Rufus the Dog, Joe Goldammer as Cat, and Leah Raidt as Girl in Emerald City Theatre's If You Give A Cat A Cupcake, adapted and directed by Ernie Nolan. (photo credit: Tom McGrath)
If You Give a Cat a Cupcake
 

Adapted and directed by Ernie Nolan
Based on book by Laura Numeroff 
at Apollo Theater, 2540 N. Lincoln (map)
thru Jan 7  tickets: $13- $16  |  more info

Check for half-price tickets
Download the show’s parent guide

   
      Read entire review

    
September 27, 2011 | 1 Comment More

REVIEW: The Wizard of Oz (Emerald City Theatre)

     
     

Learning to love the things you’ve had all along

     
     

Wizard of Oz - Emerald City Theatre

   
Emerald City Theatre presents
   
The Wizard of Oz
   
Written by L. Frank Baum, Adapted by John Kane
Music/Lyrics by
Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg
Directed by
Ernie Nolan
at
Apollo Theater, 2540 N. Lincoln (map)
Through Jan 2  |  tickets: $13-$16  |  more info

Reviewed by Oliver Sava

I love children’s theater because the audience’s limited attention span forces wild, fearless performances from the actors as they try to hold the concentration of both children and parents. Emerald City Theatre is one of the city’s premier children’s theater companies, and their holiday production of The Wizard of Oz incorporates audience interaction and puppetry to create a visually exciting production that understands the actor/child dynamic. The actors give unbridled performances that keep the momentum moving briskly, and while they might not be the strongest in term of technique, they make up for it by having so much fun in their characters.

Molly Tower as Glinda the Good Witch - Emerald City TheatreEmerald City’s production High School Musical­-izes Arlen and Harburg’s score with a rhythm section and guitars, but the songs never lose their classic appeal. Karle’s “Somewhere Over The Rainbow” is a rousing number that captures Dorothy’s desire to find a world outside the dreariness of the Kansas countryside, and the actress’s effortless belt gets the show off to a great start. In Oz, Dorothy is greeted by Glinda’s (a hilariously irreverent Molly Tower) angelic soprano, accompanied by the denizens of Munchkinland.

As she makes her way to the Emerald City, Dorothy encounters new faces, including Scarecrow (Bret Beaudry), who serves as a major source of physical comedy throughout the show. Tinman (James Nedrud) is cleverly portrayed as an Elvis-like crooner and carries a guitar for an axe, appropriate for the Million Dollar Quartet housing Apollo Theater, and Nedrud has a smooth vocal quality that is perfect for the character. The only one of Dorothy’s new friends that struggles is Lion (Shea Coffman), and the difficulty of the character’s music isn’t helped by the ornaments Coffman adds to almost every sustained note.

Using puppets for the munchkins is hilarious and efficient, and the low-budget shortcuts that Emerald City takes contribute to much of the show’s charm. Kevin Beltz’s economical set unfolds Dorothy’s house to reveal walls with turning panels to signify location, all located in the walls of Dorothy’s home that unfolds during the storm. It’s a great effect that also saves a lot of money on scenery. Despite not being the most technically astounding or polished production, the show’s simplicity and dedicated ensemble make Dorothy’s journey through Oz easy for kids to enjoy while still entertaining for adults.

If I only had a heart by Emerald City Theatre Company Find Her! - The Wicked Witch by Emerald City Theatre Company
If I only had a brain! by Emerald City Theatre Company The Wicked Witch of the West by Emerald City Theatre Company When I am king of the forest by Emerald City Theatre Company

It is surprising how well Baum’s classic story works in a holiday setting, as the storm that whisks Dorothy away, in this production, occurs just before Christmas. Maybe it’s the combination of red and green that comes from ruby slippers – adorably reimagined as glistening ankle-boots – and the Emerald City. More likely, the connection comes from how well Baum taps into the holiday spirit of giving thanks, and taking pleasure in the company of people that will always be there for you. The important part of the holidays isn’t the presents you get, but learning to love the things you’ve had all along.

   
  
Rating: ★★★
   
  

Off to see the Wizard

        
        
November 28, 2010 | 0 Comments More

REVIEW: Pinkalicious (Emerald City Theatre)

Think Pink!

 

 Pinkalicious 9.18.2010 1

   
Emerald City Theatre presents
 
Pinkalicious   
  
Book/lyrics by Victoria and Elizabeth Kann
Music & additional lyrics by
John Gregor
Directed by
Ernie Nolan
at
Apollo Theater, 2540 N. Lincoln (map)
through January 3  |  tickets: $13-$16  |  more info

Reviewed by Allegra Gallian

Sometimes there is such a thing as too much of a good thing – as Pinkalicious Pinkterton learns in the Midwest premiere of Pinkalicious, the musical story of a young girl who gets Pinktitis from eating one too many pink cupcakes.

Emerald City Theatre’s production of Pinkalicious, based on the popular children’s book by Elizabeth Kann and Victoria Kann, brings children’s fantasy to life with its set design by Ernie Nolan. The stage is full of bright, vivid colors in hues of pinks, lime Pinkalicious 9.18.2010 2 greens, baby blues and yellows. The kid-friendly set boasts over the top scenery with giant pink glittery flowers, background houses decorated in musical scores and cupcakes everywhere. It’s certainly attention-grabbing, and the children in the audience were fascinated as they explored the set before the show began.

Pinkalicious opens on the Pinkerton family. Each cast member is automatically outgoing and bursting with energy. Pinkalicious (Lara Mainier) makes pink cupcakes with her mom, Mrs. Pinketeron (Rachel Klippel) and her brother, Peter (Shea Coffman). She wants to eat more and more but her mom and dad (Patrick Byrnes) says no, explaining why in the song “You Get What You Get and You Don’t Get Upset.” Mainier is bright and bubbly with a wonderful childlike demeanor. When she breaks out in to song, however, it seems as though some of the music is out of her vocal range and she loses the strength in her singing voice. Coffman’s Peter is a strong presence on stage and he’s a riot to watch.

The next morning Pinkalicious wakes up to discover she has turned pink from head to toe. Not know what else to do, her parents rush her to see Dr. Wink (Julia P. Gordon) who diagnoses the problem as Pinktitis. Pinkalicious is overjoyed at her condition but her parents worry. Dr. Wink informs them that the only cure is eating green foods, explained in the catchy song dance number, “Pinktitis.” Where the singing tends fall flat, the dancing shines. Highly entertaining dance numbers are well choreographed by Nolan and it’s hard not to smile while watching. The singing, on the other hand, is sometimes compromised for characterization and movement, and a little stronger diction could help audience members understand the lyrics.

John Gregor’s music throughout Pinkalicious varies in styles like pop, jazz and blues, but all the numbers are upbeat and amusing. Peter sings a bluesy number, “Pink Blues,” that allows Coffman to really show off his vocal talent. It’s clear he’s the strongest signing voice in the cast as he makes this number his own.

Pinkalicious 9.18.2010 3 Pinkalicious 9.18.2010 5

Pinkalicious at first refuses to eat anything green, but after her condition worsens and she turns from pink to red she decides it’s time to be brave and sings “Green Food,” an adorable song about eating her greens. Pinkalicious is not only an entertaining show, but it also sends a good message to the children in the audience about the importance of eating healthy.

The whole cast offers quality, fully-embraced characterization that they push far enough out to create exaggerated, engaging characters that keep the children’s attention for the entire one-hour show time. Pinkalicious even allows for the children to interact with the performers, answering questions and allowing them to become a part of the magic. The show flows along well and never drags because they cast keeps their energy levels high throughout.

Pinkalicious proves to be a whirlwind of fun and fantasy that’s perfect for kids (and kids at heart) of all ages. It’s impossible not to leave with a smile on your face and your step – if not pinker – then just a little bit lighter.

   
 
Rating: ★★★½   
   
   

Pinkalicious plays at the Apollo Theater, 2540 N. Lincoln Ave., through December 31. Tickets are $16 for adults and $13 for children and can be purchased through Emerald City’s Web site or by calling 773-935-6100.

Pinkalicious 9.18.2010 4

     
     
September 21, 2010 | 3 Comments More