Tag: The Second City

Review: Twist Your Dickens (Second City at Goodman Theatre, 2016)

Joe Dempsey stars in Twist Your Dickens, Second City at Goodman Theatre 2016           
      
  

Twist Your Dickens

Written by Peter Gwinn and Bobby Mort
at Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn (map)
thru Dec 30  |  tix: $25-$47  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
     

December 22, 2016 | 0 Comments More

A stockingful of holiday shows in Chicago for 2016!

 

Ariana Burks stars as Clara in The Nutcracker, House Theatre Chicago 2Jason Groff stars as Charlie Brown in A Charlie Brown Christmas, Broadway ChicagoLisa Gaye Dixon as Ghost of Christmas Present in A Christmas Carol at Goodman TheatreFrancis Guinan and Travis Turner in Twist Your Dickens or Scrooge You, Second City Goodman TheatreErica Stephan stars as Irene Roth in Crazy for You, Drury Lane TheatreJoe Foust and Larry Yando in A Christmas Carol, Goodman Theatre

The Chicago theater community will again produce a wide array of Christmas and holiday plays, musicals, ballets and comedies in 2016, all designed to put you in a festive mood.  Find the entire list of holiday offerings below

November 30, 2016 | 0 Comments More

Review: A Red Line Runs Through It (Second City e.t.c.)

Peter Kim in A Red Line Runs Through It, Second City etc          
       
    
A Red Line
  Runs Through It

Written by the ensemble
e.t.c Theater, 1608 N. Wells (map) 
Open run  |  tix: $23  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
    

May 3, 2016 | 1 Comment More

Review: Twist Your Dickens or Scrooge You! (The Second City and Goodman Theatre, 2015)

Francis Guinan and Travis Turner star in Second City and Goodman Theatre's "Twist Your Dickens" by Peter Gwinn and Bobby Mort, directed by Matt Hovde. (photo credit: Liz Lauren)         
    

     
Twist Your Dickens! 

By Peter Gwinn and Bobby Mort
Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn (map)
thru Jan 2  |  tix: $15-$45  | more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
    

December 15, 2015 | 0 Comments More

Review: A Clown Car Named Desire (The Second City e.t.c.)

Christ Witaske and Brooke Breit star in Second City e.t.c.'s "A Clown Car Named Desire", written and performed by Brooke Breit, Punam Patel and Mike Kosinski, directed by Ryan Bernier. (photo credit: Todd Rosenberg)        
       
A Clown Car Named Desire  

By Brooke Breit, Punam Patel, Mike Kosinski,
Michael Lehrer, Carisa Barreca, Chris Witaske
Directed by Ryan Bernier  
at Piper’s Alley, 1608 N. Wells (map) 
Open Run  |  tickets: $23-$28   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

July 15, 2013 | 0 Comments More

Review: South Side of Heaven (Second City)

     
     

A morbid comedy of fate done to perfection

     
     

(L-R) Edgar Blackmon, Holly Laurent, Katie Rich, Tim Robinson, Timothy Edward Mason, and Sam Richardson. Photo by Michael Brosilow

  
The Second City presents
  
South Side of Heaven
  
Directed by Billy Bungeroth
Musical direction by Julie Nichols
at The Second City Mainstage, 1616 N. Wells (map)
open run  |  tickets: $22-$27  |  more info

Reviewed by Jason Rost

Watching “Saturday Night Live” this past year I’ve tried hard to believe it’s on its way back to a quality decade. There are currently some talented cast members and writers, a few with Second City roots. However, I am consistently disappointed. Every sketch comes off as a stale parody of a brilliant sketch from past golden ages of the show. I was not exactly sure what was missing until I saw The Second City’s 99th revue, The South Side of Heaven. After over 50 years, Second City has managed to continue to stay current, take risks and find ways to still shock audiences through comedy. South Side shakes the status quo with writing that is absurd, truthful, and at (L-R) Holly Laurent, Sam Richardson • Photo by Michael Brosilow.times, refreshingly dark. Don’t expect a laugh-line at the end of each scene in this revue. There are moments of silence and reflection to take in comedy writing that is more than just a collection of sketches. Director Billy Bungeroth (critically acclaimed for his e.t.c. show still running, The Absolutely Best Friggin’ Time of Your Life our review ★★★½) maintains an aspect of comedy that is currently non-existent in the NBC counterpart to Second City: it remains vital.

Bungeroth of course has an unbelievably talented group of actors and writers in Edgar Blackmon, Holly Laurent, Timothy Edward Mason, Katie Rich, Sam Richardson and Tim Robinson. While Richardson gives what may be the best Obama impersonation I’ve ever seen, if there’s only one name to store away from this cast, Robinson is the one. He is bravely sardonic and juvenile as the outgoing Mayor Daley, complete with a flapping cape that is the Chicago flag. This is juxtaposed by Edgar Blackmon’s no-nonsense rapping version of Rahm Emanuel who, with a mob boss’ glare, reminds us to “Pay your taxes.” Robinson also showcases his commitment to his scene partner, which happens to be a Chipotle burrito, in one of the scenes I most identified with, along with a horde of other Chicagoans whose mouth waters at the glimpse of the gold foil wrapped delicacy on a billboard.

It also must be noted that, in part, what makes the casting of this show extraordinary is that there are two African-American actors, something Second City and other Chicago comedy venues fail at historically. The impact is that this allows the stereotypes of whites and blacks to be played to the edge; it also allows the African-American actors to play roles that have nothing to do with race, such as a truly heartfelt, hilarious and truthful segment featuring Robinson and Richardson. Robinson is a 30-something who still believes he’s going to play basketball for the Bulls, while Richardson is a United Center security guard who has aspirations of being a ninja. Heck, as he states, “I’m practically a ninja already.” The friendship and imagination in this scene plays out delightfully, especially to a Gen X and Gen Y crowd who may or may not still play NBA Jam on an old Sega Genesis.

Laurent and Rich complement each other perfectly in their scenes, and hold their own as the female voice in this male dominated cast. They never quite play the sex object—even as Kobe Bryant’s escorts they are still tongue-in-cheek as opinionated Chicago Polish babes. In another piece, Laurent is an English teacher hiding domestic issues which the smart outspoken Rich, as her student, sees through. The message in this scene attests to teaching our youth more facts about how the “real world” works. The segment could also hold its own as an incredible ten-minute play.

     
(L-R) Holly Laurent, Tim Robinson. Photo by Michael Brosilow. (L-R) Timothy Edward Mason, Holly Laurent, Katie Rich, Edgar Blackmon •  Photo by Michael Brosilow
(L-R) Holly Laurent, Katie Rich • Photo by Michael Brosilow (L-R) Timothy Edward Mason, Tim Robinson, Sam Richardson, Edgar Blackmon • Photo by Michael Brosilow

Thematically, South Side makes a comedic case for one of the nation’s largest problems. In America, people do not think of themselves as poor or middle class. Everyone is wealthy and successful and only in a temporary rut. We are constantly looking upward. People continue to overspend and over-live thinking that the future version of them will be rich enough to afford it. This is why people love American Idol and The Lottery, because it provides the illusion that “Joe Schmo” can become an overnight millionaire, or, why Mayor Daley fought so hard to get Chicago the Olympics, even when it wasn’t fiscally reasonable. South Side professes that people might try realizing that EVERYBODY’S life is miserable regardless of how perfect other people’s lives seem to be. While the show doesn’t entirely bash having dreams and aspirations, it does suggest that there are simply certain fates that cannot be altered. Perhaps only Cubs fans truly understand this notion, and in the best sketch of the night, the rousing debate between Cubs fans and Sox fans transcends the “Red Eye” obligatory June front cover and encroaches upon the territory of Jabari Asim (author of “The N-Word”).

The outrageous and darkly absurd also make several appearances throughout the night. Laurent has created a character reminiscent of Mary Catherine Gallagher, only the awkwardness is amped way up. A scene in with Robinson is the driver of a Chicago tourist horse drawn carriage ride (with Richardson dedicating all of himself to the part of the horse) goes to a place you don’t see coming, and keeps going. And Robinson earns the full exposure award of the night for unabashedly leaving nothing on stage as a captivating dancer.

(L-R) Tim Robinson, Sam Richardson • Photo by John McCloskeyAnother absolutely brilliant scene stars the quick witted Timothy Edward Mason as a TSA agent. Without giving too much away, this segment revolves around the new full body screening at airport security check-in sites. However, it becomes about so much more as it uses the audience, without their knowledge, to unquestionably prove how fragile our identities really are in the over exposed society we live in.

The technical and musical elements play an exceptionally large role in this production. Spotlights don’t always illuminate what we should be looking at. Julie B. Nichols’ music direction provides for very effective live accompaniment. Her transition music is a heavy quick dance beat that keeps the crowd lively. Sarah E. Ross’ set screams contemporary…and Apple Store, something that is both visually fresh and opens itself up to parody for the actors.

For those of you who treat Second City a little like Blue Man Group (you saw it 7 years ago and enjoyed it and you’d like to get back one day), do not make this mistake with South Side. All Second City shows are not created equal. There is no better way to come out of your winter hibernation than to laugh uncontrollably at this show. It may even make you change some of your Facebook privacy settings, reanalyze race in Chicago, and accept what life has dealt you with a stiff drink taking in this revue, created by some of the best in the world at what they do. You might even call them the “Montell Jordan” of comedy.

  
  
Rating: ★★★★
  
  

(L-R) Holly Laurent, Timothy Edward Mason, Katie Rich • Photo by Michael Brosilow

South Side of Heaven is in an open run at The Second City Mainstage, 1616 N. Wells. Shows are Tuesday through Thursday 8PM, Friday and Saturday 8PM and 11PM, and Sunday 7PM. Tickets are $22 Sunday thru Thursday and $27 Friday and Saturday. Tickets are available by phone at (312) 337-3992 or online at www.SecondCity.com.

     
     
April 24, 2011 | 1 Comment More

REVIEW: Second City’s “Taming of the Flu”

The Second City at 50: Good for what ails you

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The Second City presents

Taming of the Flu

Written and performed by Lauren Ash, Shelly Gossman, Anthony LeBlanc, Brad Morris, Andy St. Clair and Emily Wilson
Directed by Mick Napier
Open run (ticket info)

reviewed by Leah A. Zeldes

They may be 50 years old, but The Second City can still bring up some healthy laughs.

TAMING_OF_THE_FLU_PR_008Most of us won’t get to go to The Second City’s big 50th anniversary celebration with its famous alumni this weekend — many events are sold out — but the troupe’s latter-day regulars do their predecessors proud with their anniversary mainstage revue, Taming of the Flu.

This is the kind of infectious comedy that made The Second City famous: Fast-paced, creative, topical, hilarious.

There are gags about swine flu*, of course, and health-care reform, with some needle-sharp jabs at insurance companies and politicians of all stripes. Some subtly and not-so-subtly humorous routines point up racial issues, the economic meltdown, war, terrorism and the other ills of our time.

Modern life gets its jibes, from the guy who’s addicted to his iPhone to the football player who taunts his opponents with Harry Potterisms to lesbian bachelorettes. In an anniversary mood, they look back over 50 years, comparing teenagers from 1959, ’79 and revisiting a 1950s bomb shelter.

Best of all are the Chicago-centric gags. Maybe it’s a return to The Second City’s roots or maybe it’s just that during this chilly and cash-strapped season they figure they don’t have to play to the tourists, but some of the best bits in this revue aim straight at the home crowd with nary any translation — such as a poignant paean to Chicago winters, lawn chairs and all. Chicago cops. Red-light cameras. The Olympics. Indiana casinos. Aldermanic candidates. A sidesplitting sketch covers local cabbies’ recent call for fare hikes.

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As with all revues, some sketches are funnier than others, but the jokes roll out nonstop, fast as sneezes. The six ensemble members keep ’em coming with  feverish timing, dead-on expression and keen comic gestalt.

Compared to Tamiflu, laughter may not be the best medicine, but I defy anyone to leave this show not feeling better than when he went in. If it doesn’t cure what ails you,* at least you’ll forget your suffering for a while.

Rating: ★★★★

TAMING_OF_THE_FLU_PR_006Notes: The Second City ticket prices are due to rise Jan. 1 to a minimum of $22 for general-admission seats and up to $46 for a new class of "premium" seats. Parking in the Piper’s Alley garage is $1 off with validation at the box office.

* Chicago Theater Blog does not advocate going to the theater while suffering with H1N1 flu or any other contagious disease. Fortunately, this show is in open run. Please stay home until after you have completely recovered, if only for the sake of any critics who may be in the audience. Gesundheit.

December 9, 2009 | 2 Comments More

This week’s Chicago theater openings & closings

Skyline-Chicago

show openings

Garden of the Three Gorilla Tango Theatre

A Hampstead Hooligan in King Arthur’s Court Chicago dell’Arte

Illocal Comedy Corn Productions

It’s Good for You 2 Gorilla Tango Theatre

Jackie: an American Life Theatre-Hikes

The Night Season Vitalist Theatre

Rollin’ Outta Here Naked Gorilla Tango Theatre

Scotland Road Gorilla Tango Theatre

Last of My Species Redmoon Theater

Timeless Is More Gorilla Tango Theatre

TV Re-Runs A Reasonable Facsimile Theatre

 

distant-chicago-skyline

show closings

Cirque Shanghai: Bright Spirit Navy Pier

Culture/Clash Rasaka Theatre 

The Duck Variations Theatre-Hikes

Rod Blagojevich Superstar! The Second City

Short Shorts Annoyance Theatre

The Tragedy of Jennifer, Brad and Angelina Blackbird Theatre

September 3, 2009 | 0 Comments More