Tag: Tom Logan

Review: Something Rotten! (Broadway in Chicago)

Something Rotten  cast at Broadway in Chicago (JD)            
        

  

Something Rotten! 
 
By Karey Kirkpatrick, Wayne Kirkpatrick
   and John O’Farrel
at Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph (map)
thru July 23  |  tix: $27-$98  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

July 15, 2017 | 0 Comments More

Review: The SpongeBob Musical (Broadway in Chicago)

Nickelodeon and Broadway in Chicago's "The SpongeBob Musical" at the Oriental Theatre.          
      

   
The SpongeBob Musical 

Conceived by Tina Landau, Kyle Jarrow
Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph (map)
thru July 10  |  tix: $33-$100  |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
     

June 28, 2016 | 0 Comments More

Review: Beautiful-The Carole King Musical (Broadway in Chicago)

Abby Mueller stars as Carole King in Broadway in Chicago's "Beautiful" by Douglas McGrath and Carole King, directed by Marc Bruni. (photo credit: Joan Marcus)          
      
Beautiful 

Book by Douglas McGrath
Music/Lyrics by Carole King, Gerry Goffin,
   Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil 
Oriental Theatre, 24 W. Randolph (map)
thru Feb 21  |  tix: $37-$137   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets   
    

December 10, 2015 | 0 Comments More

Review: Godspell (Marriott Theatre)

Brian Bohr and cast in Marriott Theatre's "Godspell" by Stephen Schwartz, directed by Matt Raftery. (photo credit: Peter Coombs)        
      
Godspell

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz 
Conceived by John-Michael Tebelak
Directed and Choreographed by Matt Raftery
at Marriott Theatre, Lincolnshire (map)
thru Aug 10  |  tickets: $40-$48   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
                   Read review 
     

July 13, 2014 | 0 Comments More

Review: Next to Normal (Drury Lane Theatre)

Susie McMonagle stars in Drury Lane Theatre's "Next to Normal" by Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey, directed by William Osetek. (photo credit: Brett Beiner)        
       
Next to Normal 

Written by Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey  
Directed by William Osetek
Drury Lane Theatre, Oakbrook Terrace (map)
thru Oct 6  |  tickets: $35-$49   |  more info
       
Check for half-price tickets 
    
        
        Read entire review
     

August 28, 2013 | 2 Comments More

REVIEW: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (Drury Lane)

 

Dynamic choreography, rousing leading lady save flawed musical

 

 (L-R) Cara Salerno, Vanessa Panerosa, Amber Mak, Hallie Cercone, Abby Mueller, Katie Huff, and Amanda Kroiss star in SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS, running through December 19 at Drury Lane Theatre. Photo by Brett Beiner

        
Drury Lane Oakbrook presents
   
Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
   
Book by Gene del Paul, Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn
Music/Lyrics by Gene del Paul, Al Kasha, Joel Hirschhorn and Johnny Mercer
Directed by Bill Jenkins
Musical Direction by
Roberta Duchak
at
Drury Lane Theatre, Oakbrook Terrace (map)
through December 19  |  tickets: $31-$45  |  more info

Reviewed by Oliver Sava

In the 1954 movie musicalSeven Brides for Seven Brothers”, when men kidnap women and trick them into marriage, it’s not Stockholm syndrome, it’s love. “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” is one of those movie musicals that is a product of its time, when women were looked at as little more than glorified housekeepers and baby makers, born to do the will of their man. When Adam Pontipee (Steve Blanchard) deceives the sassy Milly (Abby Mueller) into marrying him, his six brothers set out to capture wives for themselves, ambushing six town girls and throwing them in the back of their wagon. It’s offensive, but the music is jovial and melodic, the dancing is energetic and plentiful, and the film’s leading man Howard Keel’s booming voice and charming smile make it difficult to despise the chauvinistic Adam.

(L-R) Richard Strimer (Benjamin) and Abby Mueller (Milly) star in SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS, running through December 19 at Drury Lane Theatre. Photo by Brett BeinerMy problems with the stage adaptation of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers arise from its attempts to flesh out the characters, which sounds like a good thing but ends up backfiring by making them even shallower. The solos do very little to make you sympathize with the characters, with Milly’s “One Man” beginning as a condemnation of her husband’s trickery before devolving into a tribute to female subservience. Conversely, Adam’s big Act Two moment of redemption “Where Were You?” attempts to justify his sexism by giving him a daddy complex, blaming his actions on his absent father instead of taking responsibility himself. It’s not difficult to assume that Adam’s behavior is a product of his environment, but when it is put into song it just makes the already unlikable character seem pathetic. Blanchard’s vocals don’t help matters, lacking the timbre and strength expected from an 1850 frontiersman. And while the added ensemble numbers manage to evoke the musical style of the film, the solos and smaller group sequences have a contemporary feel that is out of place with the rest of the show’s classic musical theater sound.

The highlight of the production is easily Milly and her relationship with her six brothers-in-law. Mueller’s crystal clear tone and powerful belt make her musical numbers stand out, and she has great chemistry with her new relatives as she assumes a dominating mother position in the household. Watching the brothers transform under Milly’s feminine influence is a joy, from learning to dance in “Goin’ Courtin’” to finally appreciating their women in the heartfelt “Glad That You Were Born.” With the brothers, there is evidence of a struggle between the uncivilized way they’ve been brought up and the restraint that makes for successful courting. “We Gotta Make It Through The Winter” is a hilarious exclamation of horny frustration, but it is followed by Daniel (William Travis-Taylor) and Frank (Brandon Springman) ruminating on the somber effects of loneliness in the beautiful “Lonesome Polecat.”

 

(L-R)  Abby Mueller (Milly) and Steve Blanchard (Adam) star in SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS, running through December 19 at Drury Lane Theatre. Photo by Brett Beiner (L-R) Richard Strimer, Jarret Ditch, William Travis Taylor, Chris Yonan, Brandon Springman and (back) Zach Zube star in Seven Brides for Seven Brothers.  Photo by Brett Beiner.

The brothers learning to dance comes in handy for Tammy Mader’s intense, dynamic choreography. Maybe the reason Adam and Milly’s romance never blossoms on stage is because they don’t have a nice dance together like the brothers and their brides. There isn’t much depth to these characters and their affection for each other, but the substance appears in their dancing, when the chemistry really ignites. The extended town dance sequence in Act I is a mesmerizing affair, albeit a little chaotic and unclear at times, while an Act II all-bride dream ballet brings some sensuality to the affair.

Like the film, this production is propelled by its dancing, but bodies in movement can’t overcome all the flaws of the writing. The changes to the film give the story a more modern context, and the attempt to psychoanalyze the characters through song removes much of the musical’s charm. Drury Lane’s Seven Brides for Seven Brothers is a polished, well-performed production, but the questionable source material prevents it from rising to true greatness.

   
   
Rating: ★★½
   
  

(L-R) Chris Yonan, Hallie Cercone, Jarret Ditch, and Cara Salerno star in SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS, running through December 19 at Drury Lane Theatre. Photo by Brett Beiner

 

October 25, 2010 | 0 Comments More